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[Science Highlight] Two years of Pioneer Gliders: A track line view

In July, the OOI CGSN operations team completed another “refresh” of the Pioneer glider fleet. The nominal lifetime for OOI coastal gliders (battery limited) is 90 days. The fleet is refreshed by recovery of exhausted gliders and deployment of refurbished gliders with fresh batteries. The Coastal Pioneer Array is designed to have 6 Coastal Gliders […]

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The Ocean Observatories Initiative is moving full speed ahead at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.  This unprecedented ocean science project is streaming a wealth of marine data straight from the ocean to the World Wide Web, making it free for anyone to use.  In the image above, an OOI coastal surface buoy is recovered from the ocean and hoisted onto the fantail of the research vessel Neil Armstrong.  Photo Credit: Paul Matthias, WHOI

Observing the Oceans, a Photo Tour

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the Marine Implementing Organization for the OOI Coastal Pioneer and Global Arrays has created a photo tour of their journey with the OOI from the development and design of these arrays to the completion of construction.

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The R/V Neil Armstrong, moments before reaching her new home dock location for the first time.  Photo Credit: Gary Cook

Welcome Aboard the R/V Neil Armstrong

Welcome the newest member of the nation’s research vessel fleet, the R/V Neil Armstrong! Christened after the legendary explorer Neil Armstrong, the new ship will seek to follow his legacy of exploration and scientific discovery. Capable of ranging up to 11,500 nautical miles, the Neil Armstrong is 238 feet long, is equipped with two full-sized […]

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Satellite imagery shows the exchange of warm core ring water (red) with the colder continental shelf waters (blue). Satellite imagery, however, could not help scientists determine the underlying process for the warm water intrusion; instead they used data from ocean robots or “gliders” recently installed off the coast of Massachusetts. The scientists have dubbed the events “Pinocchio’s Nose Intrusions” (PNI) because the warm intruding water continues to ‘grow’ for hundreds of miles, moving in the opposite direction from the northward movement of the Gulf Stream. (Illustration by Jack Cook, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

Gulf Stream Ring Water Intrudes onto Continental Shelf Like “Pinocchio’s Nose”

Ocean robots installed off the coast of Massachusetts have helped scientists understand a previously unknown process by which warm Gulf Stream water and colder waters of the continental shelf exchange. The process occurs when offshore waters, originating in the tropics, intrude onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf and meet the waters originating in regions near the […]

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Satellite imagery shows the exchange of warm core ring water (red) with the colder continental shelf waters (blue). Satellite imagery, however, could not help scientists determine the underlying process for the warm water intrusion; instead they used data from ocean robots or “gliders” recently installed off the coast of Massachusetts. The scientists have dubbed the events “Pinocchio’s Nose Intrusions” (PNI) because the warm intruding water continues to ‘grow’ for hundreds of miles, moving in the opposite direction from the northward movement of the Gulf Stream. (Illustration by Jack Cook, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

[OOI IN THE NEWS] Gulf Stream Ring Water Intrudes Onto Continental Shelf Like ‘Pinocchio’s Nose’

Ocean robots installed off the coast of Massachusetts have helped scientists understand a previously unknown process by which warm Gulf Stream water and colder waters of the continental shelf exchange. (From Eurekalert.org) — The process occurs when offshore waters, originating in the tropics, intrude onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf and meet the waters originating in […]

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