The National Science Foundation encourages scientists to add new instruments or platforms onto the Observatory, and provides funding for this through its core programs. Possibilities exist to connect instrumentation to both the Regional Cabled Array and uncabled moorings. The following outlines some requirements for how to approach adding instrumentation and platforms to the different types of arrays:

Regional Cabled Array Connection

OOI’s Regional Cabled Array (RCA) is located off the coast of Washington and Oregon. With 880 km of backbone cable, 7 primary nodes, and 18 junction boxes, RCA has capacity for additional instrumentation. Staff are available for one-on-one meetings to discuss researchers’ proposed plans and how they might be able to accommodate such requests. If you are interested in setting up a meeting, please send an email to ooicable@uw.edu.

Cabled Array
Nine-hundred kilometers of cable serves seven Primary Nodes: PN1A (Slope Base), PN1B (Southern Hydrate Ridge), PN3A (Axial Base), PN3B (Axial Summit), PN5A (Mid-Plate), PN1C (Oregon Offshore), and PN1D (Oregon Shelf).

This webinar outlines the process and information required to submit an NSF proposal for adding instrumentation onto the RCA, including the requirement of a letter from the RCA team on technical feasibility.

Regional Cabled Array staff provide an overview of the RCA infrastructure and engineering specifics, including connectors, communication capabilities, and testing procedures.

Connecting to Uncabled Arrays and Moorings

Pioneer, Endurance, Irminger Sea, and Station Papa Arrays. The uncabled array component of OOI consists of four different arrays.

Some uncabled moorings have the ability to provide power for instruments and telemetry of data from certain platforms, similar to the Regional Cabled Array. Users can also propose to attach instruments to moorings that are self-powered and self-recording.

This webinar outlines the process and information required to submit an NSF proposal for adding instrumentation onto one of the four uncabled arrays.