Ocean Data Lab Nuggets Providing Foundation for Accessible Oceans

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researcher Amy Bower and oceanographer Leslie Smith have teamed up to make ocean science accessible to the visually impaired. The team is using data nuggets—curated OOI data sets—created by the National Science Foundation funded Ocean Data Labs to design and evaluate auditory displays that can communicate ocean science. The team is using five data nuggets to work with and represent through sound, including the two-way transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere, the seafloor falling several feet during the 2015 Axial Seamount volcanic eruption, and the reaction of microscopic marine organisms off the coast of Oregon during the 2017 total solar eclipse.  Read more about this Accessible Oceans project here.

 

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Ocean Data Labs Tutorial at WHOI Available Online

The Zoom screen was full as 40 people participated in the third of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s (WHOI) Data Science Summer Series on 4 August 2020.  Research Programmer Dr. Sage Lichtenwalner, of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, who helped design and implement the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Ocean Data Labs, presented.

Lichtenwalner gave an overview of the many resources available through the Ocean Data Labs project, which is developing, testing, refining, and disseminating easy-to-use, interactive Data Explorations and Data Lab Notebooks for use in the classroom. Entertaining and information, the hour-long presentation flew by as Lichtenwalner presented tricks and tips to downloading OOI data, how to use OOI data in python and other computing platforms such as the Google Colab interface, and ended with a demonstration visualization of OOI data collected by its Pioneer Array. The complete webinar can be viewed here.

Dr. Stace Beaulieu, a senior research specialist in Biology and coordinator of WHOI’s Ocean Informatics Working Group, planned and hosted the session.

 

 

 

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Ocean Data Labs Webinar 16 September

On 16 September at 4 pm Eastern, Ocean Data Labs will kick off it fall webinar series: Ocean Data Labs Plus, a webinar series for Community College and University Professors teaching oceanography or geosciences courses. The series opener will be “New You Can Use,” hosted by the OOI Data Labs Project Team and special guests.

The webinar will explore how the Data Labs Project can support your efforts to introduce big data into your undergraduate courses.  Join the Team to find out about newly-developed interactive online data-focused activities that are grounded in learning science – and consider how to effectively incorporate them into your courses. Check out the Ocean Data Lab’s  online collection of data explorations and data nuggets in advance, and bring your questions and ideas.  Each webinar will last about 60-75 minutes and is meant to be more of an interactive discussion.

Register: https://rutgers.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJApfuGoqjItGtbfEBMLQFf9MNkZTDCVGUdp

 

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Invitation to Integrate OOI Data into Teaching

In the March 2020 issue of Oceanography, a group of authors issued an invitation to undergraduate classroom instructors to integrate OOI data into their classrooms.

Abstract

There are many benefits to using real data in undergraduate science education, including building analytical and problem-solving skills and visualizing concepts through real-world examples. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) provides a unique source of continuous, long-term oceanographic data from multiple locations in the world ocean. Each of these arrays hosts a suite of co-located instruments that measure physical, chemical, geological, and biological properties. Existing educational resources derived from OOI data can be leveraged for undergraduate teaching activities in and beyond the classroom. We provide example applications of the use of OOI resources in lesson plans and in research experiences for undergraduates. There are also abundant opportunities for new resources to be developed by the community. Our goal is to guide educators in determining appropriate OOI data sets and applications for their own needs.

Read the complete article Using Authentic Data from NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative in Undergraduate Teaching: An Invitation here.

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Opportunity to Test OOI Data Lab Notebooks

The OOI Ocean Data Labs team is looking for instructors of introductory oceanography courses to “test drive” a collection of new online laboratories that focus on important oceanographic themes and topics using OOI data.

They are seeking a pilot implementation team of 14-16 faculty to implement two labs with students this Fall.  They are offering a $750 stipend, which includes a training webinar, detailed feedback and evaluation, and a wrap-up session.  The implementation must be completed by December 2020.

Beginning in January 2020, a team of faculty contributors compiled a sequence of OOI Data Labs into an online laboratory manual.  It includes topics in biological, chemical, physical and geological oceanography for use in typical Introductory Oceanography courses.  The manual is a collection of eight lab exercises, with built-in assessments, and accompanying instructor guides.

Applications are due Sunday 9 August 2020. Apply here.

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Eight Weeks of Intensive Virtual Learning

[media-caption type="image" path="https://oceanobservatories.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Thank-you2.jpg" link="#"] Sixteen students spent eight intensive weeks during this year’s virtual REU program. Credit: Janice McDonnell.[/media-caption]

Two weeks. That is the amount of time Janice McDonnell and Sage Lichtenwalner, Co-PIs of the OOI Ocean Data Lab Project, had to create an eight-week intensive, hands-on virtual program for Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) students, who couldn’t attend their original programs due to COVID-19 restrictions. McDonnell and Lichtenwalner jumped in with both feet and successfully pulled together a program for 16 undergrads from 16 institutions that will wrap up on July 31st. Not only did they have to develop a curriculum in short order, they recruited 17 mentors, who provided one-on-one mentoring for each of the REU students.

In 14 days, McDonnell and Lichtenwalner, working with colleagues at the Rutgers RIOS REU, developed a curriculum, which included two two-hour workshop sessions on Zoom every day for the first two weeks. The workshop was followed by six weeks where students focused on a research project using oceanographic data to answer a scientific question. They were helped by REU leaders and mentors along the way.

The initial workshop focused on students using a “baby data set” before working on something as complex as an OOI dataset or other similarly large dataset. “Initially, we gave them mini research projects that could be done in two weeks.  This allowed the students to be collaborative and interactive, while learning Python as a tool using data to answer questions about the ocean,” explained McDonnell.

The key to the program’s success was keeping it engaging.  The curriculum mixed up content, approach, and activities to ensure students stay involved on and off the screen. The team used a tactical approach – starting where students are and building upon their level of understanding. They incorporated a lot of different approaches, including think-pair-shares and an activity from the Right Question Institute, another NSF-funded project, which guides people to ask better research questions.

“We were constantly looking for opportunities to be interactive, reflective, and to give students the opportunity to apply their knowledge,” added McDonnell.

Another technique used were Zoom breakout groups to supplement group interaction. These breakout sessions provided students with opportunities to work together, with mentors, and to get to know each other.

Breakout sessions were also used to meet members of a career panel in virtual personalized sessions.“The career panel for this REU cohort was much more diverse than it is typically.  The virtual nature of the interaction made it possible for people from all over the country to join in and participate,” said Lichtenwalner.  “We facilitated it in a nice round robin sort of way using Zoom’s breakout function. Students chose their top choices, then met with them either individually or with another student.  This gave them an incredible opportunity to meet people in careers that they might not otherwise have access to.”

“I’m really proud of our REU,” said McDonnell. “It’s not easy to teach online but good learning can, and does, happen online and we were able to do that. And the collaboration that took place was really the secret sauce for making this all work. NSF program officer Lisa Rom and Science Assistant Rennie Meyers were committed to and worked really hard to find a solution to make the REU program happen in the middle of a pandemic.  The students were great and so excited about the opportunity that we put together for them. And, the mentors went above and beyond the call of duty to help make this program work for the students.”

Each week, for example, one mentor, Dr. Jessica Carriere-Garwood, of Rutgers University introduced her students to people in her professional circle at lunch time each week, with the opportunity to talk about what the students are doing and their interests. “That doesn’t always happen in a regular REU. There are a lot of pluses and minuses of being virtual and this was certainly one of the pluses,” added McDonnell.

Ed Dever, one of the mentors from Oregon State University, had this to say about his mentoring experience: “Janice and Sage did a remarkable job spinning this REU up on short notice. They mentored not just the students, but the mentors (well, at least this mentor!). Janice, Sage, and Christine Bean did an amazing job of building a virtual community of students and mentors on the fly. This virtual community provided a unique experience to the students in that the community was much broader than an in-person REU at a single institution. It took all of us out of our comfort zones and helped us grow. Throughout the whole process, Sage patiently guided REU students in technical aspects of using Python to access and analyze data.”

The REU cohort will finish their research projects and present on 30-31 July.  Of the 16 students, eight are using data from the OOI.

Citing the success of this first virtual REU, the team’s National Science Foundation (NSF) program officer Rom pondered “Why don’t we do this all the time, even if there isn’t a pandemic?“

Based on the successful experience this summer, NSF’s Division of Ocean Sciences is encouraging REU proposals for virtual REU’s, and especially those that use OOI data. The deadline is August 26th this year. Apply here.

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Ready-to-use Educational Datasets Available

A new website of curated OOI datasets, called Data Nuggets, has launched.  It contains valuable resources ready for integration into educational activities. The nuggets explore various concepts common in upper-level high school and introductory college courses and are designed and packaged to be readily accessible to educators to integrate into their existing curricula.  Datasets were selected based on their quality and alignment with a broader OOI Science Theme.

The nuggets were created as part of the National Science Foundation-funded OOI Synthesis & Education project, Ocean Data Lab,  conducted by Rutgers University and led by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership.

For now, four data nuggets are available:

  • 2015 Axial Seamount Eruption
  • Seasonal Phytoplankton Blooms at High Latitudes
  • Flux of CO2 Between Ocean and Atmosphere
  • Seasonal Mixing of the Irminger Sea Water Column

The material provided in each nugget ranges from a description of scientific relevance to high resolution graphs to how use Python to pull and use OOI data in the classroom.  The nuggets are designed to support educators as they design their own activities using OOI data.

More nuggets will be continually added so check the website often.

 

 

 

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