OOI Launches “Download” to Keep Community Informed

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The first issue of Download, the OOI’s new newsletter,  was released on 1 May.  It provides a short, concise look at the OOI, with clickable links for digging deeper into specific topics. It covers the latest OOI developments, scientific advances being made using OOI data, and opportunities for you to participate in the OOI, through help with proposals, data use, workshops, and other events.

The newsletter is available online here. If you’d like to subscribe, please send an email to dtrewcrist@whoi.edu, with a subject line: Download subscribe. 

 

 
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Fifteen Findings in 15 minutes

“Just like lightning,” in one-minute presentations, 15 scientists shared amazing ways they are using OOI data in scientific investigations and in the classroom. This round of lightning talks capped the Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board’s (OOIFB) Town Hall at the 2020 Ocean Sciences Meeting on 20 February, demonstrating the multiple and creative ways OOI data are being used to answer key science questions in a changing environment.

The presentations ranged from how students are using real-life and real-time OOI data to advance their understanding of scientific principles to how researchers are using OOI data to identify the presence of marine life by sound to how modelers are making OOI data more accessible and useable.

“We were simply thrilled by the depth, breadth, and range of applications of OOI data shown during this lightning round,” Kendra Daly, chair of the OOIFB.  “We were pleased so many presenters were willing to accept the challenge. This enthusiastic response clearly shows that OOI data are being used to help answer important science questions.”

Brief summaries of the talks are presented below.

Advancing science

Isabela Le Bras, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, reported on a recent article in Geophysical Research Letters, where she and her colleagues describe how they used data from the Irminger Sea Array moorings (2014–2016) to identify two water masses formed by convection and showing that they have different rates of export in the western boundary current. Upper Irminger Sea Intermediate Water appears to form near the boundary current and is exported rapidly within three months of its formation. Deep Irminger Sea Intermediate Water forms in the basin interior and is exported on longer time scales. The subduction of these waters into the boundary current is consistent with an eddy transport mechanism. The eddy transport process is more effective for the waters cooled near the boundary current, implying that cooling near boundary currents may be more important for the climate than has been appreciated to date.

Since 2017, Clare Reimers and Kristen Fogaren, Oregon State University, have been working to assess seasonal variability in benthic oxygen consumption and the contribution of benthic respiration to the development of hypoxic conditions in the northern California Current, using time series data from the OOI Endurance Array. Reimers and Fogaren measured benthic oxygen consumption rates using in situ eddy covariation techniques and ex situ core incubations, during a series of ten cruises that allowed sampling near the Endurance Oregon Shelf and Inshore stations, in all seasons. During these cruises, the researchers used real-time data provided by the Endurance Array to optimize the settings for their eddy covariance deployments. They are now examining property-relationships in discrete bottom water samples collected during the cruises and using data from OOI assets to help separate influences of mixing and biochemical processes in the water column and sediments. The researchers are also synthesizing benthic flux measurements and placing these rates in the context of cross-shelf glider measurements and benthic node time series.

Adrienne Silver, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth provided details about how she is using Pioneer Array data to learn more about the influence of warm core rings on Shelf break circulation.  Results from a 40-year Warm Core Ring census show a regime shift in warm core ring formation at 2000, with the number of rings doubling from an average of 18 rings per year (during 1980-1999) to 33 rings per year (during 2000-2019). This regime shift creates a large increase in the amount of warm salty water being transported northward toward the shelf from the Gulf Stream. The preferred pathway of these rings, or the Ring Corridor seem to indicate their proximity to the shelf break and the Pioneer array during their lifetime. The goal of Silver’s project is to understand how these warm core rings affect the shelf break exchange while traveling along the shelf. A large focus of the study will be on the salinity intrusion events which might be sourced from these warm core rings.

Liz Ferguson, CEO and founder of Ocean Science Analytics, is using data from OOI’s Coastal Endurance and Regional Cabled Arrays to determine the variables that are most useful for assessing the ecosystem of this region and obtaining baseline information on marine mammal acoustic presence for use in monitoring.   Using long term physical and biological data provided by these arrays, Ferguson is assessing long-standing shifts in the ecology of this coastal and offshore environment by associating physical oceanographic variables with the vocal presence of marine mammals using the broadband hydrophone data. Temporal changes in the occurrence of marine mammal species such as killer whales, sperm whales and dolphins can be used as an indicator of ecosystem shifts over time. She is analyzing passive acoustic data provided by the OOI arrays to determine the presence of vocally active marine mammal species, identify their spatial and temporal use of these sites, and combining this information with the physical oceanographic variables to assess the ecological characteristics associated with marine mammal occurrence.

Sam Urmy of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) also is using OOI acoustical data in his research.  Using an upward-looking echosounder and a high-frequency hydrophone at MBARI’s Monterey Accelerated Research System, Urmy showed how small animals in the epipelagic and mesopelagic altered their behavior in response to predators.  These responses included abrupt dives during bouts of foraging by dolphins, changes in depth to avoid predatory fish schools, and dramatic alterations to daily vertical migratory behavior. Continual observations of the mesopelagic with active and passive acoustics are revealing several dynamic predator-prey interactions in an ecosystem that is typically thought of as relatively slow and static.

Veronica Tamsitt of the University of New South Wales used the OOI’s Southern Ocean mooring and the Southern Ocean Flux Site (SOFS, in the Southeast Indian) to study the Sub Antarctic Mode water (SAMW) formation. Tamsitt’s and her colleagues findings were reported in the Journal of Climate in March 2020. Using data from the two mooring locations, the researchers were able to compare and contrast characteristics and variability of air-sea heat fluxes, mixed-layer depths, and SAMW formation. The researchers found that inter mixed-layer depth anomalies tended to be intermittent at the two moorings, where anomalously deep mixed layers were associated with anomalous advection of cold air from the south, and conversely shallow mixed layers correspond to warm air from the north. Both the winter heat flux and mixed-layer depth anomalies, however, showed a complex spatial pattern, with both positive and negative anomalies in both the Indian and Pacific basins that Tasmitt and colleagues relate to the leading modes of climate variability in the Southern Ocean.

Editor’s note: The Southern Ocean Array was decommissioned in January 2020.  Its data, however, are still available for use by researchers, students, and the public.

Bringing OOI data into the classroom

Sage Lichtenwalner, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey reported on the progress of the Ocean Data Labs Project. This project is a Rutgers-led effort to build a “Community of Practice” to tap into the firehose of OOI ocean data to support undergraduate education. To date, the project has hosted four “development” workshops that introduced participants to the OOI, conducted data processing with Python notebooks, and shared effective teaching strategies, in addition to a series of introductory workshops and webinars.  As part of the development workshops, 56 university, college, and community college faculty designed 19 new “Data Explorations,” featuring web-based interactive “widgets” that allow students to interact with pre-selected data from the OOI. The project also sponsors a series of webinars, a fellowship program, and is compiling a library of resources (including coding notebooks, datasets, and case studies in teaching) to help the community.

Cheryl Greengrove, University of Washington Tacoma, summarized an article in the March issue of Oceanography that she and colleagues from across the United States wrote detailing ways to integrate OOI data into the undergraduate curriculum. The wealth of freely-accessible data provided by OOI platforms, many of which can be viewed in real or near-real time, provides an opportunity to bring these authentic data into undergraduate classrooms. The TOS article highlights existing educational resources derived from OOI data that are ready for other educators to incorporate into their own classrooms, as well as presents opportunities for new resources to be developed by the community. Examples of undergraduate introductory oceanography OOI data-based lessons using existing interactive online data widgets with curated OOI data on primary productivity, salinity, and tectonics and seamounts are presented, as well as ways to use OOI data to engage students in undergraduate research. The authors provide a synthesis of existing tools and resources as a practical how-to guide to support new resource development and invite other educators to develop and implement new educational resources based on OOI data.

Matthew Iacchei, Hawaiʻi Pacific University, presented how he has been integrating OOI data explorations to supplement his upper division oceanography lecture and labs with real data from around the world. Last semester, he had students explore patterns of dissolved oxygen and impacts of anoxia at the coastal endurance array in Oregon and compare that data to dissolved oxygen data the students collected in Kāneʻohe Bay, Hawaiʻi. This semester, students are working through two exercises with OOI data as part of their primary productivity lab (perfect, as it is now online!). Students will compare vertical profiles from Hawaiʻi with seasonal variations across the world, and will compare latitudinal drivers of primary production using data from a time-series from the Southern Ocean Array.

Strengthening OOI data usability

Wu-Jung Lee, a senior oceanographer at the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, is using data collected by the OOI to develop new methodologies for analyzing long-term ocean sonar time series. In a project funded by the National Science Foundation, she and her colleagues show that unsupervised matrix decomposition techniques are effective in discovering dominant patterns from large volumes of data, which can be used to describe changes in the sonar observation. Their preliminary analysis also show that the summaries provided by these methods facilitate direct comparison and interpretation with other ocean environmental parameters concurrently recorded by the OOI. A parallel effort that spun out of this project is an open-source software package echopype, which was created to enable interoperable and scalable processing of biological information from ocean sonar data.

As part of the Rutgers Ocean Modeling Group, in conjunction with University of California Santa Cruz, John Wilkin and Elias Hunter are delivering a high-resolution data assimilative ocean model analysis of the environs of the Pioneer Coastal Array, including a systematic evaluation of the information content of different elements of the observing network. The project uses the Regional Ocean Modeling System with 4-Dimensional Variational data assimilation. To produce a comprehensive multi-year (2014-2018) analysis required them to assimilate all available Pioneer CTD data, with quality checks, in a rolling sequence of data assimilation analysis intervals. They used three days of data in each analysis, which required queries to with a time range constraint and relevant platform (i.e. glider, profiler, fixed sensor), migrating  all Pioneer CTD data (wire following profilers, gliders, fixed sensors, plus ADCP velocity) to an ERDDAP server. The simple graphing capabilities in ERDDAP allow quick browsing of the data to trace quality control or availability issues, and ERDDAP provides a robust back-end to other web services to create more sophisticated graphical views, or time series analysis. Using the ERDDAP Slide Sorter tool, they operate a quick look Control Panel to monitor the data availability and quality.

Mitchell Scott and colleagues Aaron Marburg and Bhuvan Malladihalli Shashidhara at the University of Washington, are studying how to segment macrofauna from the background environment using OOI data from the Regional Cabled Axial Seamount Array. Their long-term goal is to use an automated approach to study species variation over time, and against other environmental factors. Their initial step focuses specifically on scale worms, which are very camouflaged, making them difficult to detect. To address this, the researchers initially used a deep learning model, called U-Net, to detect and localize the scale worm locations within an image. To address the high rate of false positives using this model, they added an additional classifier (a VGG-16 model) to verify the presence of scaleworms.  This combined, applied approach proved feasible for scale worm detection and localization. Yet because the environment of the Axial Seamount is so dynamic due to the growth and decay of chimneys at the site and resulting changes in bacteria and macrofauna present, they found the performance of the model decreased over time.

Weifeng (Gordon) Zhang of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been using Pioneer Array data to understand the physical processes occurring at the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf break, including the intrusion of Gulf Stream warm-core ring water onto the shelf and the ring-induced subduction of the biologically productive shelf water into the slope sea. His findings were reported in a Geophysical Research Letters paper where data from the Pioneer Array moorings and gliders demonstrated the anomalous intrusion of the warm and salty ring water onto the shelf and revealed the subsurface structure of the intrusion. Zhang also shared findings reported in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans where data from the Pioneer Array showed a distinct pattern of relatively cold and fresh shelf water going underneath the intruding ring water. These results show the subduction of the shelf water into the slope sea and a pathway of shelf water exiting the shelf. In both instances, Zhang and his colleagues used computer modeling to study the dynamics of these water masses. These two studies together suggest that shelf break processes are complex and require more studies in the region.

Hilary Palevsky of Boston College presented results from an ongoing project funded by the National Science Foundation’s Chemical Oceanography program, using biogeochemical data from the OOI Irminger Sea Array. Analysis of dissolved oxygen data on OOI Irminger Sea gliders and moorings from 2014-2016 showed the importance of biogeochemical data collected over the full seasonal cycle and throughout the entire water column, due to the influence of subsurface respiration and deep winter convection on biological carbon sequestration. The OOI Irminger Sea array is the first source of such full-depth year-round data in the subpolar North Atlantic. To quantitatively evaluate the annual rate of carbon sequestration by the biological pump and the role of deep winter convection, Palevsky and colleague David Nicholson of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution collaborated with OOI to improve the calibration of oxygen data at the Irminger Sea array by modifying the configuration of glider oxygen sensors to enable calibration in air each time the glider surfaces, which improves the accuracy and utility of the data collected both from gliders and from moorings. Palevsky presented preliminary results demonstrating successful glider air calibration at the Irminger array in 2018-2019 as well as work by student Lucy Wanzer, Wellesley College, demonstrating the importance of well-calibrated oxygen time series data to determine interannual variability in rates of subsurface respiration and deep winter ventilation in the Irminger Sea.

 

 

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OOI at Ocean Sciences Meeting

OOI will have a large presence at the upcoming Ocean Sciences Meeting at the San Diego Convention Center, 16-20 February, 2020. Presenters will cover topics ranging from how OOI’s data are contributing to scientific findings, how data are being integrated into college curricula, and how equipment can be added to OOI arrays to meet research needs. To learn more, attend one of the more than 30 sessions, town halls, or poster sessions listed below. Also, please stop by OOI’s booth #433 in the Exhibit Hall to talk directly with OOI Principal Investigators and for demonstrations on how to access and use OOI data.

If you find a session is not listed, please contact dtrewcrist@whoi.edu so that it may be added.

OCEAN OBSERVATORIES INITIATIVE AT OSM 

SESSIONS
TOWN HALLS
TALKS
POSTERS

OCEAN OBSERVING-RELATED TALKS AT OSM

WORKSHOPS
SESSIONS
TOWN HALLS
POSTERS

OOI SESSIONS

SESSIONS

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns 
Michael W Lomas, Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, Richard K Dewey, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Damian Grundle, Bermuda Institute for Ocean Science, St. Georges, Bermuda

TOWN HALLS

Tuesday 18 February 2020

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 9, UL
TH23G The Ocean Observatories Initiative: a catalyst for early-career, interdisciplinary research
Sophie Clayton, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, Justin E Stopa, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Ocean and Resources Engineering, Honolulu, HI, United States and Lisa M Clough, National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, United States

Thursday 20 February 2020

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 3, UL
TH43A Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board Town Hall
Annette M DeSilva, Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board – Administrative Support Office, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Timothy J Crone, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, Lisa M Clough, National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, United States and Bauke H Houtman, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States

TALKS

Tuesday 18 February 2020

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 1A, UL
PC21A-05 Rapid eddy-mediated export of waters formed by boundary convection in the Irminger Sea
Isabela Alexander-Astiz Le Bras1, Fiammetta Straneo1, James Holte1, Femke de Jong2 and N. Penny Holliday3, (1) Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2) Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands, (3) National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 11B, UL
ED21A-05 Using Authentic Data from the Ocean Observatories Initiative in Undergraduate Teaching
Hilary I Palevsky, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States, Cheryl Lee Greengrove, University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States, Silke Severmann, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Stephanie Murphy, Consortium for Ocean Leadership, United States, Leslie Smith, Youroceanconsulting, Knoxville, United States and Kristen Yarincik, Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Washington, DC, United States

09:15 – 09:30, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-06 OOI Data Explorations: A Collection of Online Data Visualization Activities to Engage Introductory Undergraduate Students
Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Janice D McDonnell, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Department of Youth Development, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Catherine Halversen, University of California Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States and Kristin I Hunter-Thomson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

09:30 – 09:45, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-07 OOI Data Labs Workshops: Equipping professors with the tools to tap into a fire hose of ocean data for undergraduate education
Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Galloway, NJ, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Brooke Arlite Love, Western Washington University, Shannon Point Marine Center, Bellingham, WA, United States, Ellen A R Iverson, Carleton College, SERC, Northfield, MN, United States, Ellen Altermatt, Carleton College, Science Education Resource Center, Northfield, MN, United States, Janice D McDonnell, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Department of Youth Development, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Catherine Halversen, University of California Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA, United States, Kristin I Hunter-thomson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Denise Bristol, Hillsborough Community College, Biological and Earth Sciences, Ruskin, FL, United States

OB23B-01 The seasonal progression of rates of productivity and export from the North Pacific NASA EXPORTS field study as observed by autonomous asset
David P Nicholson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Eric A D’Asaro, Applied Physics Lab, Univ of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Andrea J Fassbender, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Craig Lee, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Mary Jane Perry, University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States and Andrew F Thompson, California Institute of Technology, Physical Oceanography, Pasadena, CA, United States

09:45 – 10:00, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-08Teaching Students Plate Tectonics and Seafloor Magmatism Using Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI) Data and Resources
Benjamin R Jordan, Brigham Young University – Hawaii, Laie, HI, United States and Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

Thursday 20 February 2020

15:00 – 15:15, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS43A-05 Sustained, High-Resolution Profiler Observations from the Washington Continental Slope
Craig M Risien1, Russell A Desiderio2, Laurie W Juranek1 and Jonathan P Fram1, (1) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D; eLightning Theater

ED51A-03Seasonal Phytoplankton Production at the New England Shelf Break Front: Observations Using the Coastal Pioneer Array’s Submarine Gliders
Kyle Ehmann1, Samantha Ferguson1, Cassandra Este Alexander2 and Robert D Vaillancourt3, (1) Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, United States, (2) Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, PA, United States, (3) Millersville University, Millersville, PA, United States

08:15 – 08:30, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-02A Review of the Regional Cabled Array in the Northeast Pacific
Rob Fatland, University of Washington Seattle Campus, IT, Seattle, WA, United States

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-05 Plugged In: Novel Sensor Development by External Researchers for Deployment on the Ocean Observatories Initiative Regional Cabled Array
Michael Vardaro1, Orest Eduard Kawka2, Wendi Ruef2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington Seattle Campus, Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

09:15 – 09:30, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-06 Sustained Observing from the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI)
Albert J Plueddemann, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Edward Paul Dever, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, Deborah S Kelley, University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Margaret Brennan-Tonetta, Rutgers University, Office of Economic Development, Piscataway, NJ, United States

11:45 – 12:00, SDCC – 5A, UL

OD52A-06 Echopype: Interoperable and Scalable Processing of Ocean Sonar Data
Wu-Jung Lee, University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, Valentina Staneva, University of Washington, eScience Institute, Seattle, WA, United States and Kavin Nguyen, University of Washington, Department of Physics, United States

POSTERS

Monday 17 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

CT14A-0835 Annual Oxygen Budget for the Subpolar North Atlantic using Air-calibrated Glider and Mooring Data from the Ocean Observatories Initiative Irminger Sea Array
Hilary I Palevsky, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States, David P Nicholson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA, United States and Lucy Wanzer, Wellesley College, Geosciences, Wellesley, MA, United States

IS14D-3241 Bottom focused cameras on the OOI Endurance Array and their potential value to ocean ecology
Chris Holm, Oregon State University, CEOAS, Corvallis, OR, United States, Kristin Politano, Oregon State University, Integrative Biology, Corvallis, OR, United States, Jonathan P Fram, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Edward Paul Dever, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States

Tuesday 18 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

ED24D-3628 Exploring seasonal variability in mixed layer depth with Ocean Observatories Initiative Ocean Data Labs
Rachel Eveleth, Oberlin College, Oberlin, United States, Karin Lemkau, Western Washington University, United States, Ian M Miller, Washington Sea Grant/Peninsula College, Port Angeles, WA, United States and Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

ED24D-3629 Implementation of Google Earth and OOI Data Exercises into an Introductory Oceanography Class
Cynthia Venn, Bloomsburg University, Environmental, Geographical & Geological Sciences, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA, United States

ED24D-3630 Oceans and the Carbon Cycle: What Drives Air-Sea Exchange of CO2? Exploring Large Datasets from the Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI)
Robert C Rhew, University of California Berkeley, Geography Department, Berkeley, CA, United States, Nadia Pierrehumbert, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, United States, Randal Reed, Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District, Red Bluff, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States

ED24D-3631 Oceans of Data: Enhancing Data Literacy by Bringing Real Data into Introductory Oceanography Courses
Mikelle Nuwer1, Cheryl Lee Greengrove2, Julie E Masura2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

ED24D-3632 Solving Challenges of Integrating Large Datasets into Community College Asynchronous Online Science Classes by Using a Scaffolding-Learning Cycle Approach to Teaching and Learning
Denise Bristol, Hillsborough Community College, Biological and Earth Sciences, Ruskin, FL, United States, Jessica Olney, Hillsborough Community College, Earth Sciences, Tampa, FL, United States and Peter A Sleszynski, Hillsborough Community College, Environmental Science and Technology, Plant City, FL, United States

ED24D-3633Using Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI) Data to Enhance Student Learning about the Factors Affecting Primary Production in the Southern Hemisphere Polar Pacific Ocean.
Dina DiSantis, Montgomery County Community College, STEM Department, Pottstown, PA, United States, Jean Anastasia, Suffolk County Community College, Seldon, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Matthew Iacchei, Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, HI, United States

ED24D-3634 Using OOI Datasets to Expand Quantitative Skills in an Introductory Oceanography Course
Elizabeth S Gordon, Fitchburg State University, Earth and Geographic Sciences, Fitchburg, MA, United States

MG24A-2190 Geophysical investigation of exchange between planetary oceans and rocky interior- knowledge from deep sea scenarios on Earth
Donna K Blackman, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Andrew T Fisher, University of California Santa Cruz, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

IS24A-3273 CHEMINI: CHEmical MINIaturised analyser for in situ monitoring of macronutrients and bioactive metals in marine waters
Agathe Laes-Huon1, Romain Davy1, Léna Thomas1, Julien Legrand2, David Le Piver2, Patrick Rousseaux2, Jean-Yves Coail2, Michel Repecaud1, Karenn Bucas1, Cecile Cathalot3, Nicolas Gayet4, Jozee Sarrazin5 and Pierre-Marie Sarradin6, (1) IFREMER, REM/RDT/LDCM, Plouzané, France, (2) IFREMER, REM/RDT/SIIM, Plouzané, France, (3) IFREMER, REM/GM/LCG, Plouzané, France, (4) IFREMER, centre de Brest, LEP, Plouzané, France, (5) IFREMER, Centre de Bretagne, Plouzané, France, (6) IFREMER, Brest, France

OB24A-0445 Hypoxia in surface coastal waters at the entrance of the Gulf of California and its relation to coastal upwelling
Carlos Alberto Herrera Becerril, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencias de la Tierra, Mexico City, DF, Mexico, Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología., Mexico City, SI, Mexico, Andrea Rebeca Lara Cera, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, México City, DF, Mexico, León Felipe Álvarez Sánchez, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, Unidad de Informática Marina, Mexico City, DF, Mexico, Maria Luisa Machain-Castillo, UNAM National Autonomous University of Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Mexico City, DF, Mexico and Ana Carolina Ruiz-Fernández, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Mazatlán, SI, Mexico

ED24D-3631 Oceans of Data: Enhancing Data Literacy by Bringing Real Data into Introductory Oceanography Courses
Mikelle Nuwer1, Cheryl Lee Greengrove2, Julie E Masura2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

Wednesday 19 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

IS34C Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns II
Michael W Lomas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, Richard K Dewey, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Damian Grundle, Bermuda Institute for Ocean Science, St. Georges, Bermuda

HE34A-1990 Enhancement of ocean and sea ice in situ observations in the Arctic under the Horizon2020 project INTAROS
Agnieszka Beszczynska-Möller1, Hanne Sagen2, Peter Voss3, Mikael Sejr4, Thomas Soltwedel5, Truls Johannessen6, Marie-Noelle Houssais7, Andreas Rogge5, Ian Allan8, Frank Nilsen9, Angelika Renner10, Lars Henrik Smedsrud6, Nicholas Roden6, Jean-Pierre Gattuso11, Laurent Chauvaud12, Claudie Marec12, Bin Cheng13, Andrew King8, Christine Provost7, Marcel Babin14 and Mathilde Sørensen15, (1) Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland, (2) Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway, (3) Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, København K, Denmark, (4) Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus, Denmark, (5) Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (6) University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen, Norway, (7) CNRS-LOCEAN, Paris, France, (8 )Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway, (9) The University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway, (10)Institute of Marine Research, Tromsø, Norway, (11)CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer, France, (12) CNRS-UIEM, Brest, France, (13) Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland, (14) Takuvik Joint International Laboratory, Université Laval & CNRS, Québec, QC, Canada, (15) University of Bergen, Department of Earth Sciences, Bergen, Norway

IS34C-3370 Disentangling human-induced x natural sediment resuspension events in Barkley Canyon, NE Pacific, using cabled observatory, mooring and vessel AIS data
Fabio Cabrera De Leo1,2, Grant Garner2, Pere Puig3 and Sarah Paradis4, (1) Ocean Networks Canada, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, (2) University of Victoria, Department of Biology, Victoria, BC, Canada, (3) Inst Ciencies Mar CSIC, Barcelona, Spain, (4)Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), Departament de Física and Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain

OB34A-0555 Whittard Canyon: a pathway and sink for organic carbon
Furu Mienis, Sofia Ledin, Marc Lavaleye and Gerard Duineveld, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands

ME34D-0189 Cross-platform Ecosystem Assessment Through Characterization of Prey Habitat Suitability and Predator Occurrence off Newport, Oregon
Liz Ferguson, Ocean Science Analytics, San Diego, CA, United States

IS34A-3339 The Use of Open Source Scripting to Reduce Autonomous System Complexity and Cost
Andrea Rowe, United States and Chad Collett, SubC Imaging, Clarenville, NF, Canada

Thursday 20 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

AI44C-2440 Protocol for the Assessment and Correction of Moored Surface Water and Air pCO2 Measurements from the Ocean Observatories Initiative Endurance Array I Abstract
Christopher E Wingard, Edward P Dever, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

AI44A-2411 Event and Seasonal Scale Variability of Surface Heat and Momentum Fluxes off Oregon and Washington I Abstract
Edward Paul Dever1, Jonathan P Fram2, Craig M Risien2, Russell A Desiderio3 and Christopher E Wingard2, (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (3) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

IS44A-3404 New Tools for OOI Surface Profiler Data Delivery and Visualization I Abstract
Ian Black, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

OD44B-3494 Re-training a Joint U-Net-CNN Deep Learning Image Classification Pipeline for the Segmentation of Subsea Macrofauna I Abstract
Mitchell Scott1, Bhuvan Malladihalli Shashidhara2 and Aaron Marburg1, (1) Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

 

OCEAN OBSERVING-RELATED SCHEDULE

Sunday 16 February 2020

08:30 – 16:00, Marriott Marquis – Solana, L1
Data Labs: Using Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI) Data to Engage Students in Oceanography

Monday 17 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 7B, UL
PI11A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms I

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS11ATurbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization I

10:30 – 12:30, SDCC – 7B, UL
PI12A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms II

10:30 – 12:30, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS12A Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization II

12:45 – 13:45, SDCC – 5A, UL
TH13C The NASA Surface Biology and Geology (SBG) mission and the observation of coastal and inland waters from space

14:00 – 16:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D; eLightning Theater
IS13B Emerging Ocean Technologies: A Snapchat of New Sensors and Observing Platforms I eLightning

14:00 – 16:00, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS13B Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization III

Tuesday 18 February 2020

08:00-10:00, SDCC – 1B, UL
HE21A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System I

08:00-10:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM21A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis I 

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM23A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis II

Wednesday 19 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI31A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) I

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 1B, UL
HE31A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System II

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM31A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis III

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 11B, UL
TH33H Ocean Science Applications at the European Space Agency

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI33A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) II

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM33A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis IV

Thursday 20 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI41A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) III

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories I

10:30—12:30, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS42A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems II

10:30—12:30, SDCC – 5A, UL
OD42A New Information Systems Tools for Implementing Autonomous Multisource, Multipoint Observing Systems I

 10:30—12:30, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PL42A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories II

14:00-16:00, SDCC -11A, UL
IS43A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems III

14:00-16:00, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PL43A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories III

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS51A Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS52A The Tropical Pacific Observing System: Meeting the Needs of Researchers and Stakeholders I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 7A, UL
ME52A Biologging Ecology and Oceanography: Integrative Approaches to Animal-Borne Observations in a Changing Ocean I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PS52B Multiscale Oceanic Processes and Air-Sea Interactions in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension Region: Observations and Modeling I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – SDCC – 10, UL
SI52A Ocean Renewable Energy and Synergies with Ocean Technologies II

Tuesday 18 February 2020

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 4, UL
TH23B Ocean Partnerships for Sustained Observing: Moving Beyond the Frameworks

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 5A, UL
TH23C Observing Ocean Surface Currents from Local to Global Scales

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 9, UL
TH23G The Ocean Observatories Initiative: a catalyst for early-career, interdisciplinary research

18:30—19:30, SDCC – 9, UL
TH25F Progress Related to Global Deep Ocean Observing

Wednesday 19 February 2020

12:45—13:45, SDCC – 7A, UL
TH33I Expanding Access to Critical Marine Biological Diversity Observations

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 3, UL
TH35A NOAA Ocean Satellite Data Products for Science and Applications

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 5B, UL
TH35D Data FAIR: Ocean Data Integration – Challenges, Successes, Tools, and Platforms

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 9, UL
TH35G Capacity Development: A Major Need for Ocean Observing, Monitoring, Analysis and Forecasting

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 1B, UL
TH35H 20 years of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System: Celebrating the successes and charting the future

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 8, UL
TH35I Observations for the Present and Future – A Panel of Vendors’ Views on Technology

Thursday 20 February 2020

12:45—13:45, SDCC – 3, UL
TH43A Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board Town Hall

12:45—13:45, SDCC -9, UL
TH43G IndOOS-2: A Roadmap to Better Observations and Predictions of the Rapidly Warming Indian Ocean

 18:30-19:30, SDCC – SDCC – 7B, UL
TH45E Data FAIR: Ocean Data Viz – Beautiful Data, Understandable Visualizations

 18:30-19:30, SDCC – SDCC – 7A, UL
TH45H All-Atlantic Ocean Observing System (AtlantOS program) Town Hall

Monday 17 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ED14B Capacity Development: A Key Need for Global Ocean Observing Systems I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE14B New Insights into the Beaufort Gyre of the Arctic Ocean: Scientific Questions, Observing Technologies, and Modeling Capabilities I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS14B Emerging Ocean Technologies: A Snapchat of New Sensors and Observing Platforms II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PI14A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms III Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS14BTurbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization V Posters

Tuesday 18 February 2020

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

ED24D Teaching with Data: Engaging Students in Learning Ocean Sciences Through Large Data Sets II Posters

 16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS24A Autonomous Observing Systems for Macronutrients and Bioactive Trace Metals in Coastal and Open-Ocean Settings: Present Status, Challenges, and Emerging Technologies I Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OM24B Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis V Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PL24B Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories IV Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS24B Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization IV Posters

Wednesday 19 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
AI34A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) V Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE34A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System III Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE34B Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System IV Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS34B Best Practices for Building a Global Ocean Observing System Responsive to Societal Needs by Linking Basin-Scale Efforts Around the Globe I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
FIS34C Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS34D The Tropical Pacific Observing System: Meeting the Needs of Researchers and Stakeholders II Posters

 16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ME34A Biologging Ecology and Oceanography: Integrative Approaches to Animal-Borne Observations in a Changing Ocean II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ME34E What Are Long-Term Observations Teaching Us About Resilience of Marine Ecosystems? I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OD34D New Information Systems Tools for Implementing Autonomous Multisource, Multipoint Observing Systems II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OM34A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis VI Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PL34A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories V Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS34C Observing the Ocean Surface Topography at High Resolution: Opportunities and Challenges for the Future SWOT Mission II Posters

Thursday 20 February 2020

16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
AI44A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) VI Posters

 16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS44A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems IV Posters

 16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS44B Multiscale Oceanic Processes and Air-Sea Interactions in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension Region: Observations and Modeling II Posters

 

 

 

 

 

 

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OOI Status Update: 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting Special Edition

Ocean Sciences Meeting 2016 Logo

Letter from the Director

OOI User Community and Colleagues,

As you’ll see in this week’s update the entire OOI Project Team is going all out to have some great presentations available for you at next week’s Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans.  If you’re going to be in New Orleans next week I’d encourage you to attend the many OOI-related Town Halls, poster sessions, and presentations, and don’t forget to swing by the OOI booth (#611)!  We’ll be ready and waiting for you.  I’m excited about the array of presentations and talented speakers we have on tap for next week, and I’m confident that everyone who is able to spend some time with the team and attend the briefs will come away with a much clearer picture of where our program is at, and where it’s headed.  I’m also confident that you’ll come away from Ocean Sciences sharing some of the optimism I have about the exciting potential and promise of OOI as we move ahead into operations and data delivery this year.  The update below will provide you some details on what’s on tap for Ocean Sciences, and other highlights.  See you next week!

 

2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting Activities

OOI Town Hall

Tuesday, February 23, 2016: 12:45 – 1:45 PM
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Rm. 220-221

Join the OOI Program Director, Greg Ulses, the OOI Scientific Oversight Committee, and the National Science Foundation to discuss the newly commission OOI.  Topics to be discussed include: array configuration, data access and availability, case studies of data use, and upcoming plans for the next calendar year.  There will also be time for a question and answer period. Light snacks will be provided.

Chat with the OOI Data Team

We are excited to share the live OOI Data Portal with visitors to the Booth (#611). Members of the OOI data team will be onsite and ready to answer your questions from 10am-12pm Tuesday and 10am-2pm Wednesday and Thursday. Feel free to swing by! If you have a question about a specific platform, instrument, or data product, please send a note to the HelpDesk ahead of time so we can schedule an appointment for you with a member of the team who has the most experience in that specific area.  Please include the topics you would like to discuss as well as a list of potential dates/times in which you are available during Exhibit Hall hours. The Exhibit Hall is open from 9:30-6:00 Tuesday through Thursday.

OOI Presentations

Monday, February 22, 2016:  8:00-10:00 AM – Room: RO1

Session OD11A: Ocean Observatory Science: Unprecedented Access to the Sea I

8:00-8:15 AM

    • Transforming Ocean Sciences in the Northeast Pacific: NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array is Now Operational.  OD11A-01: D. Kelley

8:15-8:30 AM

    • The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data, Data and More Data.

 

    • OD11A-02: M. Crowley, et al.

8:30-8:45 AM

    • A First: Detailed Tracking of an Erupting Undersea Volcano and its Impacts on the Overlying Ocean via a Submarine Electro-Optical Sensor Network.        OD11A-03: J. Delaney

9:00-9:15 AM

    The Ocean Observatories Initiative Data Management and QA/QC: Lessons Learned and the Path Ahead.  OD11A-05: M. Vardaro, et al.

OOI Posters

Monday, February 22, 2016: 4:00-6:00 PM – Poster Hall

Poster #2291

    •   A Cabled, High Bandwidth Instrument Platform for Continuous Scanning of the Upper Ocean Water Column.  E. McRae, et al.

Poster #2394

    •   The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data Access and Visualization via the Graphical User Interface.  L. Garzio, et al.

Poster #2395

    •   Quality Assurance of Real-Time Oceanographic Data from the Cabled Array of the OOI.  O. Kawka, et al.

Poster #2396

    •   The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data Acquisition Functions and Its Built-In Automated Python Modules.  M. Smith, et al.

Poster #2397

    •   The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Unprecedented access to real-time data streaming from the Cabled Array through OOI Cyberinfrastructure.  F. Knuth, et al.

Poster #2399

    •   The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data pre-Processing: Diagnostic Tools to Prepare Data for QA/QC Processing.  L. Belabbassi, et al.

Poster #2423

      Modular Seafloor and Water Column Systems for the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array.  D. Manalang, et al.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016: 4:00-6:00 PM – Poster Hall

Poster #2455

      Operationalizing Surface Piercing Profilers.  J. Fram, et al.

Thursday, February 25, 2016: 4:00-6:00 PM – Poster Hall

Poster #1728

      The OOI Ocean Education Portal: Enabling the Development of Online Data Investigations.  C. Lichtenwalner, et al.

Click here for further details on the OOI-related talks and posters.

 

Current OOI Data Availability

The OOI Data Team is pushing toward Ocean Sciences to increase the data available through the THREDDS Server for download.  Data available includes several comprehensive data sets for individual gliders, moorings, and profilers, as well as a selection of Essential Ocean Variables.

All the data ingested into OOINet continues to be available for plotting in the OOI Data Portal.  Please note that ingestion is an early step in the full data flow process and these data have not yet gone through the quality control process. To view what has been ingested, click here to access the operator status tool.

Historical cruise data are also available for download from the OOI website.

An additional feature available on the OOI Data Portal is HD video streaming from a hydrothermal vent site on the Axial Seamount. Live video streams of the actively venting chimney are provided periodically throughout the day during the hours of 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, and 10:00 ET & PT, for a duration of 14 minutes.

We continue to provide interim delivery of the Cabled Array seismometer and bottom pressure data through IRIS http://www.iris.edu/hq/.  Delivery of Cabled Array tilt meter and co-located temperature plots continue through Dr. Bill Chadwick’s website.

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