OOI will have a large presence at the upcoming Ocean Sciences Meeting at the San Diego Convention Center, 16-20 February, 2020. Presenters will cover topics ranging from how OOI’s data are contributing to scientific findings, how data are being integrated into college curricula, and how equipment can be added to OOI arrays to meet research needs. To learn more, attend one of the more than 30 sessions, town halls, or poster sessions listed below. Also, please stop by OOI’s booth #433 in the Exhibit Hall to talk directly with OOI Principal Investigators and for demonstrations on how to access and use OOI data.

If you find a session is not listed, please contact dtrewcrist@whoi.edu so that it may be added.

OCEAN OBSERVATORIES INITIATIVE AT OSM 

SESSIONS
TOWN HALLS
TALKS
POSTERS

OCEAN OBSERVING-RELATED TALKS AT OSM

WORKSHOPS
SESSIONS
TOWN HALLS
POSTERS

OOI SESSIONS

SESSIONS

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns 
Michael W Lomas, Bigelow Lab for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, Richard K Dewey, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Damian Grundle, Bermuda Institute for Ocean Science, St. Georges, Bermuda

TOWN HALLS

Tuesday 18 February 2020

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 9, UL
TH23G The Ocean Observatories Initiative: a catalyst for early-career, interdisciplinary research
Sophie Clayton, Old Dominion University, Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, Norfolk, VA, United States, Justin E Stopa, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Ocean and Resources Engineering, Honolulu, HI, United States and Lisa M Clough, National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, United States

Thursday 20 February 2020

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 3, UL
TH43A Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board Town Hall
Annette M DeSilva, Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board – Administrative Support Office, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Timothy J Crone, Lamont -Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY, United States, Lisa M Clough, National Science Foundation, Washington, DC, United States and Bauke H Houtman, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, United States

TALKS

Tuesday 18 February 2020

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 1A, UL
PC21A-05 Rapid eddy-mediated export of waters formed by boundary convection in the Irminger Sea
Isabela Alexander-Astiz Le Bras1, Fiammetta Straneo1, James Holte1, Femke de Jong2 and N. Penny Holliday3, (1) Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, United States, (2) Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Netherlands, (3) National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, United Kingdom

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 11B, UL
ED21A-05 Using Authentic Data from the Ocean Observatories Initiative in Undergraduate Teaching
Hilary I Palevsky, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States, Cheryl Lee Greengrove, University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States, Silke Severmann, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Stephanie Murphy, Consortium for Ocean Leadership, United States, Leslie Smith, Youroceanconsulting, Knoxville, United States and Kristen Yarincik, Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Washington, DC, United States

09:15 – 09:30, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-06 OOI Data Explorations: A Collection of Online Data Visualization Activities to Engage Introductory Undergraduate Students
Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Janice D McDonnell, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Department of Youth Development, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Catherine Halversen, University of California Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States and Kristin I Hunter-Thomson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

09:30 – 09:45, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-07 OOI Data Labs Workshops: Equipping professors with the tools to tap into a fire hose of ocean data for undergraduate education
Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Galloway, NJ, United States, Dax Christian Soule, CUNY Queens College, Flushing, NY, United States, Brooke Arlite Love, Western Washington University, Shannon Point Marine Center, Bellingham, WA, United States, Ellen A R Iverson, Carleton College, SERC, Northfield, MN, United States, Ellen Altermatt, Carleton College, Science Education Resource Center, Northfield, MN, United States, Janice D McDonnell, Rutgers University New Brunswick, Department of Youth Development, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States, Catherine Halversen, University of California Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA, United States, Kristin I Hunter-thomson, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Denise Bristol, Hillsborough Community College, Biological and Earth Sciences, Ruskin, FL, United States

OB23B-01 The seasonal progression of rates of productivity and export from the North Pacific NASA EXPORTS field study as observed by autonomous asset
David P Nicholson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Eric A D’Asaro, Applied Physics Lab, Univ of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Andrea J Fassbender, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA, United States, Craig Lee, Univ Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, Melissa Omand, University of Rhode Island, Graduate School of Oceanography, Narragansett, RI, United States, Mary Jane Perry, University of Maine, Orono, ME, United States and Andrew F Thompson, California Institute of Technology, Physical Oceanography, Pasadena, CA, United States

09:45 – 10:00, SDCC – 11B, UL

ED21A-08Teaching Students Plate Tectonics and Seafloor Magmatism Using Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI) Data and Resources
Benjamin R Jordan, Brigham Young University – Hawaii, Laie, HI, United States and Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

Thursday 20 February 2020

15:00 – 15:15, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS43A-05 Sustained, High-Resolution Profiler Observations from the Washington Continental Slope
Craig M Risien1, Russell A Desiderio2, Laurie W Juranek1 and Jonathan P Fram1, (1) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D; eLightning Theater

ED51A-03Seasonal Phytoplankton Production at the New England Shelf Break Front: Observations Using the Coastal Pioneer Array’s Submarine Gliders
Kyle Ehmann1, Samantha Ferguson1, Cassandra Este Alexander2 and Robert D Vaillancourt3, (1) Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, United States, (2) Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Millersville, PA, United States, (3) Millersville University, Millersville, PA, United States

08:15 – 08:30, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-02A Review of the Regional Cabled Array in the Northeast Pacific
Rob Fatland, University of Washington Seattle Campus, IT, Seattle, WA, United States

09:00 – 09:15, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-05 Plugged In: Novel Sensor Development by External Researchers for Deployment on the Ocean Observatories Initiative Regional Cabled Array
Michael Vardaro1, Orest Eduard Kawka2, Wendi Ruef2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington Seattle Campus, Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

09:15 – 09:30, SDCC – 11A, UL

IS51A-06 Sustained Observing from the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI)
Albert J Plueddemann, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, United States, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States, Edward Paul Dever, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, Deborah S Kelley, University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States and Margaret Brennan-Tonetta, Rutgers University, Office of Economic Development, Piscataway, NJ, United States

11:45 – 12:00, SDCC – 5A, UL

OD52A-06 Echopype: Interoperable and Scalable Processing of Ocean Sonar Data
Wu-Jung Lee, University of Washington, Applied Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA, United States, Valentina Staneva, University of Washington, eScience Institute, Seattle, WA, United States and Kavin Nguyen, University of Washington, Department of Physics, United States

POSTERS

Monday 17 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

CT14A-0835 Annual Oxygen Budget for the Subpolar North Atlantic using Air-calibrated Glider and Mooring Data from the Ocean Observatories Initiative Irminger Sea Array
Hilary I Palevsky, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States, David P Nicholson, Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA, United States and Lucy Wanzer, Wellesley College, Geosciences, Wellesley, MA, United States

IS14D-3241 Bottom focused cameras on the OOI Endurance Array and their potential value to ocean ecology
Chris Holm, Oregon State University, CEOAS, Corvallis, OR, United States, Kristin Politano, Oregon State University, Integrative Biology, Corvallis, OR, United States, Jonathan P Fram, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States and Edward Paul Dever, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States

Tuesday 18 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

ED24D-3628 Exploring seasonal variability in mixed layer depth with Ocean Observatories Initiative Ocean Data Labs
Rachel Eveleth, Oberlin College, Oberlin, United States, Karin Lemkau, Western Washington University, United States, Ian M Miller, Washington Sea Grant/Peninsula College, Port Angeles, WA, United States and Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

ED24D-3629 Implementation of Google Earth and OOI Data Exercises into an Introductory Oceanography Class
Cynthia Venn, Bloomsburg University, Environmental, Geographical & Geological Sciences, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA, United States

ED24D-3630 Oceans and the Carbon Cycle: What Drives Air-Sea Exchange of CO2? Exploring Large Datasets from the Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI)
Robert C Rhew, University of California Berkeley, Geography Department, Berkeley, CA, United States, Nadia Pierrehumbert, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora, United States, Randal Reed, Shasta-Tehama-Trinity Joint Community College District, Red Bluff, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Anna Pfeiffer-Herbert, Stockton University, Pomona, United States

ED24D-3631 Oceans of Data: Enhancing Data Literacy by Bringing Real Data into Introductory Oceanography Courses
Mikelle Nuwer1, Cheryl Lee Greengrove2, Julie E Masura2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

ED24D-3632 Solving Challenges of Integrating Large Datasets into Community College Asynchronous Online Science Classes by Using a Scaffolding-Learning Cycle Approach to Teaching and Learning
Denise Bristol, Hillsborough Community College, Biological and Earth Sciences, Ruskin, FL, United States, Jessica Olney, Hillsborough Community College, Earth Sciences, Tampa, FL, United States and Peter A Sleszynski, Hillsborough Community College, Environmental Science and Technology, Plant City, FL, United States

ED24D-3633Using Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI) Data to Enhance Student Learning about the Factors Affecting Primary Production in the Southern Hemisphere Polar Pacific Ocean.
Dina DiSantis, Montgomery County Community College, STEM Department, Pottstown, PA, United States, Jean Anastasia, Suffolk County Community College, Seldon, United States, Charles Sage Lichtenwalner, Rutgers University, Marine and Coastal Sciences, New Brunswick, NJ, United States and Matthew Iacchei, Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, HI, United States

ED24D-3634 Using OOI Datasets to Expand Quantitative Skills in an Introductory Oceanography Course
Elizabeth S Gordon, Fitchburg State University, Earth and Geographic Sciences, Fitchburg, MA, United States

MG24A-2190 Geophysical investigation of exchange between planetary oceans and rocky interior- knowledge from deep sea scenarios on Earth
Donna K Blackman, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, United States and Andrew T Fisher, University of California Santa Cruz, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Santa Cruz, CA, United States

IS24A-3273 CHEMINI: CHEmical MINIaturised analyser for in situ monitoring of macronutrients and bioactive metals in marine waters
Agathe Laes-Huon1, Romain Davy1, Léna Thomas1, Julien Legrand2, David Le Piver2, Patrick Rousseaux2, Jean-Yves Coail2, Michel Repecaud1, Karenn Bucas1, Cecile Cathalot3, Nicolas Gayet4, Jozee Sarrazin5 and Pierre-Marie Sarradin6, (1) IFREMER, REM/RDT/LDCM, Plouzané, France, (2) IFREMER, REM/RDT/SIIM, Plouzané, France, (3) IFREMER, REM/GM/LCG, Plouzané, France, (4) IFREMER, centre de Brest, LEP, Plouzané, France, (5) IFREMER, Centre de Bretagne, Plouzané, France, (6) IFREMER, Brest, France

OB24A-0445 Hypoxia in surface coastal waters at the entrance of the Gulf of California and its relation to coastal upwelling
Carlos Alberto Herrera Becerril, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencias de la Tierra, Mexico City, DF, Mexico, Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología., Mexico City, SI, Mexico, Andrea Rebeca Lara Cera, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, México City, DF, Mexico, León Felipe Álvarez Sánchez, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México, Unidad de Informática Marina, Mexico City, DF, Mexico, Maria Luisa Machain-Castillo, UNAM National Autonomous University of Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Mexico City, DF, Mexico and Ana Carolina Ruiz-Fernández, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Mazatlán, SI, Mexico

ED24D-3631 Oceans of Data: Enhancing Data Literacy by Bringing Real Data into Introductory Oceanography Courses
Mikelle Nuwer1, Cheryl Lee Greengrove2, Julie E Masura2 and Deborah S Kelley3, (1) University of Washington, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington Tacoma Campus, Tacoma, WA, United States, (3) University of Washington Seattle Campus, School of Oceanography, Seattle, WA, United States

Wednesday 19 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

IS34C Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns II
Michael W Lomas, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME, United States, Richard K Dewey, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, John H Trowbridge, WHOI, Woods Hole, MA, United States and Damian Grundle, Bermuda Institute for Ocean Science, St. Georges, Bermuda

HE34A-1990 Enhancement of ocean and sea ice in situ observations in the Arctic under the Horizon2020 project INTAROS
Agnieszka Beszczynska-Möller1, Hanne Sagen2, Peter Voss3, Mikael Sejr4, Thomas Soltwedel5, Truls Johannessen6, Marie-Noelle Houssais7, Andreas Rogge5, Ian Allan8, Frank Nilsen9, Angelika Renner10, Lars Henrik Smedsrud6, Nicholas Roden6, Jean-Pierre Gattuso11, Laurent Chauvaud12, Claudie Marec12, Bin Cheng13, Andrew King8, Christine Provost7, Marcel Babin14 and Mathilde Sørensen15, (1) Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot, Poland, (2) Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen, Norway, (3) Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, København K, Denmark, (4) Aarhus University, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus, Denmark, (5) Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz-Center for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany, (6) University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen, Norway, (7) CNRS-LOCEAN, Paris, France, (8 )Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway, (9) The University Centre in Svalbard, Longyearbyen, Norway, (10)Institute of Marine Research, Tromsø, Norway, (11)CNRS-INSU, Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, Villefranche-sur-mer, France, (12) CNRS-UIEM, Brest, France, (13) Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland, (14) Takuvik Joint International Laboratory, Université Laval & CNRS, Québec, QC, Canada, (15) University of Bergen, Department of Earth Sciences, Bergen, Norway

IS34C-3370 Disentangling human-induced x natural sediment resuspension events in Barkley Canyon, NE Pacific, using cabled observatory, mooring and vessel AIS data
Fabio Cabrera De Leo1,2, Grant Garner2, Pere Puig3 and Sarah Paradis4, (1) Ocean Networks Canada, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, (2) University of Victoria, Department of Biology, Victoria, BC, Canada, (3) Inst Ciencies Mar CSIC, Barcelona, Spain, (4)Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), Departament de Física and Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain

OB34A-0555 Whittard Canyon: a pathway and sink for organic carbon
Furu Mienis, Sofia Ledin, Marc Lavaleye and Gerard Duineveld, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Den Burg, Netherlands

ME34D-0189 Cross-platform Ecosystem Assessment Through Characterization of Prey Habitat Suitability and Predator Occurrence off Newport, Oregon
Liz Ferguson, Ocean Science Analytics, San Diego, CA, United States

IS34A-3339 The Use of Open Source Scripting to Reduce Autonomous System Complexity and Cost
Andrea Rowe, United States and Chad Collett, SubC Imaging, Clarenville, NF, Canada

Thursday 20 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

AI44C-2440 Protocol for the Assessment and Correction of Moored Surface Water and Air pCO2 Measurements from the Ocean Observatories Initiative Endurance Array I Abstract
Christopher E Wingard, Edward P Dever, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

AI44A-2411 Event and Seasonal Scale Variability of Surface Heat and Momentum Fluxes off Oregon and Washington I Abstract
Edward Paul Dever1, Jonathan P Fram2, Craig M Risien2, Russell A Desiderio3 and Christopher E Wingard2, (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States, (2) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States, (3) Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

IS44A-3404 New Tools for OOI Surface Profiler Data Delivery and Visualization I Abstract
Ian Black, Jonathan P Fram and Craig M Risien, Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR, United States

OD44B-3494 Re-training a Joint U-Net-CNN Deep Learning Image Classification Pipeline for the Segmentation of Subsea Macrofauna I Abstract
Mitchell Scott1, Bhuvan Malladihalli Shashidhara2 and Aaron Marburg1, (1) Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States, (2) University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

 

OCEAN OBSERVING-RELATED SCHEDULE

Sunday 16 February 2020

08:30 – 16:00, Marriott Marquis – Solana, L1
Data Labs: Using Ocean Observatory Initiative (OOI) Data to Engage Students in Oceanography

Monday 17 February 2020

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 7B, UL
PI11A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms I

08:00 – 10:00, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS11ATurbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization I

10:30 – 12:30, SDCC – 7B, UL
PI12A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms II

10:30 – 12:30, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS12A Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization II

12:45 – 13:45, SDCC – 5A, UL
TH13C The NASA Surface Biology and Geology (SBG) mission and the observation of coastal and inland waters from space

14:00 – 16:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D; eLightning Theater
IS13B Emerging Ocean Technologies: A Snapchat of New Sensors and Observing Platforms I eLightning

14:00 – 16:00, SDCC – 15B, Mezzanine
PS13B Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization III

Tuesday 18 February 2020

08:00-10:00, SDCC – 1B, UL
HE21A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System I

08:00-10:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM21A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis I 

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM23A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis II

Wednesday 19 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI31A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) I

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 1B, UL
HE31A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System II

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM31A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis III

12:45 – 13:45, Town Hall, SDCC – 11B, UL
TH33H Ocean Science Applications at the European Space Agency

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI33A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) II

14:00—16:00, SDCC – 5A, UL
OM33A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis IV

Thursday 20 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 14A, Mezzanine
AI41A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) III

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories I

10:30—12:30, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS42A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems II

10:30—12:30, SDCC – 5A, UL
OD42A New Information Systems Tools for Implementing Autonomous Multisource, Multipoint Observing Systems I

 10:30—12:30, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PL42A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories II

14:00-16:00, SDCC -11A, UL
IS43A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems III

14:00-16:00, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PL43A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories III

Friday 21 February 2020

08:00—10:00, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS51A Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 11A, UL
IS52A The Tropical Pacific Observing System: Meeting the Needs of Researchers and Stakeholders I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 7A, UL
ME52A Biologging Ecology and Oceanography: Integrative Approaches to Animal-Borne Observations in a Changing Ocean I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – 15A, Mezzanine
PS52B Multiscale Oceanic Processes and Air-Sea Interactions in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension Region: Observations and Modeling I

10:30-12:30, SDCC – SDCC – 10, UL
SI52A Ocean Renewable Energy and Synergies with Ocean Technologies II

Tuesday 18 February 2020

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 4, UL
TH23B Ocean Partnerships for Sustained Observing: Moving Beyond the Frameworks

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 5A, UL
TH23C Observing Ocean Surface Currents from Local to Global Scales

12:45-13:45, SDCC – 9, UL
TH23G The Ocean Observatories Initiative: a catalyst for early-career, interdisciplinary research

18:30—19:30, SDCC – 9, UL
TH25F Progress Related to Global Deep Ocean Observing

Wednesday 19 February 2020

12:45—13:45, SDCC – 7A, UL
TH33I Expanding Access to Critical Marine Biological Diversity Observations

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 3, UL
TH35A NOAA Ocean Satellite Data Products for Science and Applications

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 5B, UL
TH35D Data FAIR: Ocean Data Integration – Challenges, Successes, Tools, and Platforms

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 9, UL
TH35G Capacity Development: A Major Need for Ocean Observing, Monitoring, Analysis and Forecasting

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 1B, UL
TH35H 20 years of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System: Celebrating the successes and charting the future

 18:30 – 19:30, SDCC – 8, UL
TH35I Observations for the Present and Future – A Panel of Vendors’ Views on Technology

Thursday 20 February 2020

12:45—13:45, SDCC – 3, UL
TH43A Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board Town Hall

12:45—13:45, SDCC -9, UL
TH43G IndOOS-2: A Roadmap to Better Observations and Predictions of the Rapidly Warming Indian Ocean

 18:30-19:30, SDCC – SDCC – 7B, UL
TH45E Data FAIR: Ocean Data Viz – Beautiful Data, Understandable Visualizations

 18:30-19:30, SDCC – SDCC – 7A, UL
TH45H All-Atlantic Ocean Observing System (AtlantOS program) Town Hall

Monday 17 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ED14B Capacity Development: A Key Need for Global Ocean Observing Systems I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE14B New Insights into the Beaufort Gyre of the Arctic Ocean: Scientific Questions, Observing Technologies, and Modeling Capabilities I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS14B Emerging Ocean Technologies: A Snapchat of New Sensors and Observing Platforms II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PI14A Biological Coupling to Physical Forcing on Shallow-Water Ecosystems: Using Observations to Reveal Patterns and Test Mechanisms III Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS14BTurbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization V Posters

Tuesday 18 February 2020

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D

ED24D Teaching with Data: Engaging Students in Learning Ocean Sciences Through Large Data Sets II Posters

 16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS24A Autonomous Observing Systems for Macronutrients and Bioactive Trace Metals in Coastal and Open-Ocean Settings: Present Status, Challenges, and Emerging Technologies I Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OM24B Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis V Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PL24B Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories IV Posters

16:00—18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS24B Turbulent Mixing of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer: Observation, Simulation, and Parameterization IV Posters

Wednesday 19 February 2020

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
AI34A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) V Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE34A Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System III Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
HE34B Changing Biogeochemical Fluxes, Biodiversity, and Ecological Processes in the Polar Seas, with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Arctic and Sustaining an Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System IV Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS34B Best Practices for Building a Global Ocean Observing System Responsive to Societal Needs by Linking Basin-Scale Efforts Around the Globe I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
FIS34C Sustained Ocean Observing: From Events to Assessing Long-Term Ecosystem Patterns II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS34D The Tropical Pacific Observing System: Meeting the Needs of Researchers and Stakeholders II Posters

 16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ME34A Biologging Ecology and Oceanography: Integrative Approaches to Animal-Borne Observations in a Changing Ocean II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
ME34E What Are Long-Term Observations Teaching Us About Resilience of Marine Ecosystems? I Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OD34D New Information Systems Tools for Implementing Autonomous Multisource, Multipoint Observing Systems II Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
OM34A Advances in Ocean Data Assimilation, Forecasting, and Reanalysis VI Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PL34A Atlantic Ocean Variability in a Changing Climate: Observations, Modeling, and Theories V Posters

16:00 – 18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS34C Observing the Ocean Surface Topography at High Resolution: Opportunities and Challenges for the Future SWOT Mission II Posters

Thursday 20 February 2020

16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
AI44A Fluxes and Physical Processes Near the Air-Sea Interface: Observations and Modeling (Cosponsored by the AMS Committee on Air-Sea Interaction) VI Posters

 16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
IS44A Innovation in in Situ Instrumentation, Sensors, and Observation Networks to Advance High-Resolution Data Collection and Biogeochemical Insight in Marine Ecosystems IV Posters

 16:00-18:00, SDCC – Poster Hall C-D
PS44B Multiscale Oceanic Processes and Air-Sea Interactions in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension Region: Observations and Modeling II Posters

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On August 27-29, 2018, an Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Deep Ocean Observing Workshop will be held in Seattle, WA.

This workshop will provide an interdisciplinary forum to develop deep ocean science questions and identify societal needs that could be addressed using the existing OOI infrastructure. The workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to gather detailed information about OOI infrastructure, data availability, and discuss existing and prospective Essential Ocean Variables that deep-water observatories can address. Particular attention will be paid to the capabilities and utility of the OOI Regional Cabled Array. Two days of presentations and breakout groups will be followed by one day for drafting concepts and project outlines.

Expected workshop outcomes may include identification of new cabled and stand-alone instrumentation and platforms needed to address Deep Ocean Observing Strategy goals and opportunities to leverage other regional ocean observing assets (e.g., the US Integrated Ocean Observing System – Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems, Oceans Network Canada). Lessons learned from the experience of developing these assets could be discussed. This workshop will help build and expand the deep-ocean user community interested in the NE Pacific.

[button link="https://goo.gl/forms/UfDCXlmgpgBezdoQ2"]Click here to express your interest[/button]

 

More information is available on the OOI website.

Some travel support may be available.

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Join OOI scientists and colleagues from other ocean observatories as they discuss the latest in ocean observatory science at the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland, Oregon next month.

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There will be an important Town Hall at the upcoming Ocean Sciences meeting in Portland, OR, hosted by the Ocean Observatories Initiative Facility Board (OOIFB) of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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Utilizing high volumes of data for research and education increases both opportunities and challenges to analyzing and synthesizing these data into scientific understanding. We are pleased to offer two workshops that explore the unprecedented opportunities to engage undergraduate learners in authentic data experiences using real-world data sets, models, and simulations from the OOI.

Chemistry and OOI Data Workshop – May 19-21, 2017
This workshop will focus on OOI data sets that explore salinity, pH, and PCO2 .

Geology and OOI Data Workshop – June 2-4, 2017
This workshop will look at the resources (video and data assets) from the Axial Seamount.

Both Workshops will take place at the University Inn and Conference Center at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ.

Undergraduate Professors teaching introductory level Oceanography courses are invited to participate. These workshops are for professors interested in assisting the OOI in developing teaching applications using OOI data. Our objective is to use online OOI data to teach oceanographic concepts as well as data orientation, interpretation, and synthesis skills.

Travel, meals, hotel accomodations, and a small stipend will be provided for those participating in the workshop. Approximately 10 professors will be selected for each workshop.

Interested Professors should fill out an application: http://tinyurl.com/ooieducation

For more information contact Janice McDonnell, mcdonnel@marine.rutgers.edu or download the workshop flyer.

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OOI Town Hall

TUESDAY, December 13, 2016: 6:15 – 7:15 PM, Moscone West, Room 2008
Utilizing Online Streaming Data from the National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observatories Initiative
In January 2016, the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) went operational with online streaming data freely accessible by login. Over the year, the scientific community downloaded terabytes of data every month, engaged in workshops and webinars, and submitted proposals to further utilize the OOI. Join the OOI Director, Data Manager and scientists for a discussion touching on how you can best utilize this resource. Topics include: array configuration, data access and availability, case studies of data use, proposal submission, and upcoming plans for the next calendar year.

Chat with the OOI Data Team

We are excited to share the live OOI Data Portal with visitors in the Exhibit Hall at Booth #245. Members of the OOI Data Team will be onsite and ready to answer your questions Monday through Wednesday during regular Exhibit Hall hours. Feel free to swing by! If you have a question about a specific platform, instrument, or data product, please send a note to the HelpDesk (help@oceanobservatories.org) ahead of time so we can schedule an appointment for you. Please include the topics you would like to discuss as well as a list of potential dates/times in which you are available Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. During those days, the Exhibit Hall is open Mon. 6:00-8:00 PM, Tues. & Wed. 9:30-5:00 PM.


OOI RELATED TALK

    THURSDAY December 15 Time: 1730 – 1745, Moscone West, Room 3009
    (OS44B-07) Circulation, Hydrography, and Transport over the Summit of Axial—the Destination Node of OOI’s Cabled Array.
    Authors: G. Xu, J.W. Lavelle
    Abstract: A numerical model of ocean flow and transport is used to extrapolate observations of currents and hydrography and infer patterns of material flux in the deep ocean around Axial Volcano—the destination node of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI)’s Cabled Array. Using an inverse method, the model is made to approximate measured deep ocean flow around this site during a 35-day time period in 2002. The model is then used to extract month-long mean patterns and examine smaller-scale spatial and temporal variability around Axial. Like prior observations, model month-long mean currents flow anti-cyclonically (clockwise) around the volcano’s summit in toroidal form at speeds of up to 7 cm/s. The mean vertical circulation has a net effect of pumping water out of the caldera. Temperature and salinity iso-surfaces sweep upward and downward on opposite sides of the volcano with vertical excursions of up to 70 m. As a time mean, the temperature (salinity) anomaly takes the form of a cold (briny) dome above the summit. Passive tracer material released at the location of the ASHES vent field exits the caldera through its southern open end and over the western bounding wall driven by vertical flow. Once outside the caldera, the tracer circles the summit in clockwise fashion, while gradually bleeding southwestward into the ambient ocean. Another tracer release experiment using a source of 2-day duration inside and near the northern end of the caldera suggests a residence time of the fluid at that locale of 5-6 days.

 

OOI RELATED POSTERS

All posters are in the Moscone South Poster Hall

TUESDAY December 13
Time: 0800-1220

    (C21C-0717) Air-sea interactions in the Southeast Pacific: Mooring, ship, and float observations.
    Authors: S. Ogle, W.M. Tamsitt, L.D. Talley, S.T. Gille, S.P. Bigorre
    Abstract: The atmosphere interacts with the ocean through a number of mechanisms: for example, shortwave radiation heats the surface waters, wind-driven turbulence inputs momentum to the upper ocean, and precipitation freshens the surface layer. These processes are especially challenging to measure in the Southern Ocean due to its severe winter storms. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) air-sea flux mooring, deployed in February 2015 at 55°S,90°W, provides the first extended time series of upper ocean measurements from the southeast Pacific. This poster focuses on heat fluxes and the effect of meteorological events on the surface ocean at the OOI mooring. The ERA-interim, OAFlux, NCEP, and the Southern Ocean State Estimate flux products are compared to data from the OOI mooring and from the December 2015 OOI deployment cruise on the R/V Palmer in the southeast Pacific. The flux products agree well with the observations. An analysis of storm events during the cruise shows that even summer storms can quickly alter the surface waters by decreasing temperature and salinity while deepening the mixed layer from under 50 m to over 100 m in less than three days.

Time: 1340 – 1800

    (S23A-2749) An Offshore Geophysical Network in the Pacific Northwest for Earthquake and Tsunami Early Warning and Hazard Research.
    Authors: W.S.D. Wilcock, D.A. Schmidt, J.E. Vidale, M. Harrington, P. Bodin, G. Cram, J.R. Delaney, F.I. Gonzalez, D.S. Kelley, R.J. LeVeque, D. Manalang, C. McGuire, E.C. Roland, J. Tilley, C.J. Vogl, M. Stoermer
    Abstract: The Cascadia subduction zone hosts catastrophic earthquakes every few hundred years. On land, there are extensive geophysical networks available to monitor the subduction zone, but since the locked portion of the plate boundary lies mostly offshore, these networks are ideally complemented by seafloor observations. Such considerations helped motivate the development of scientific cabled observatories that cross the subduction zone at two sites off Vancouver Island and one off central Oregon, but these have a limited spatial footprint along the strike of the subduction zone.

    The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network is leading a collaborative effort to implement an earthquake early warning system in the Washington and Oregon using data streams from land networks as well as the few existing offshore instruments. For subduction zone earthquakes that initiate offshore, this system will provide a warning. However, the availability of real time offshore instrumentation along the entire subduction zone would improve its reliability and accuracy, add up to 15 s to the warning time, and ensure an early warning for coastal communities near the epicenter. Furthermore, real-time networks of seafloor pressure sensors above the subduction zone would enable monitoring and contribute to accurate predictions of the incoming tsunami.

    There is also strong scientific motivation for offshore monitoring. We lack a complete knowledge of the plate convergence rate and direction. Measurements of steady deformation and observations of transient processes such as fluid pulsing, microseismic cycles, tremor and slow-slip are necessary for assessing the dimensions of the locked zone and its along-strike segmentation. Long-term monitoring will also provide baseline observations that can be used to detect and evaluate changes in the subduction environment.

    There are significant engineering challenges to be solved to ensure the system is sufficiently reliable and maintainable. It must provide continuous monitoring over its operational life in the harsh ocean environment and at least parts of the system must continue to operate following a megathrust event. These requirements for robustness must be balanced with the desire for a flexible design that can accommodate new scientific instrumentation over the life of the project.

WEDNESDAY December 14
Time: 0800-1220

    (OS31A-1992) SeaView: bringing EarthCube to the Oceanographer.
    Authors: K.I. Stocks, S.C. Diggs, R.A. Arko, D. Kinkade, A. Shepherd

    Abstract: As new instrument types are developed, and new observational programs start, that support a growing community of “dry” oceanographers, the ability to find, access, and visualize existing data of interest becomes increasingly critical. Yet ocean data, when available, is are held in multiple data facilities, in different formats, and accessible through different pathways. This creates practical problems with integrating and working across different data sets. The SeaView project is building connections between the rich data resources in five major oceanographic data facilities – BCO-DMO, CCHDO, OBIS, OOI, and R2R* – creating a federated set of thematic data collections that are organized around common characteristics (geographic location, time, expedition, program, data type, etc.) and published online in Web Accessible Folders using standard file formats such as ODV and NetCDF. The work includes not simply reformatting data, but identifying and, where possible, addressing interoperability challenges: which common identifiers for core concepts can connect data across repositories, which terms a scientist may want to search that, if added to the data repositories, will increase discoverability; the presence of duplicate data across repositories, etc.

    We will present the data collections available to date, including data from the OOI Pioneer Array region, and seek scientists’ input on the data types and formats they prefer, the tools they use to analyze and visualize data, and their specific recommendations for future data collections to support oceanographic science.

    * Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO), CLIVAR and Carbon Hydrographic Data Office (CCHDO), International Ocean Biogeographic Information System (iOBIS), Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), and Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) Program.

THURSDAY December 15
Time: 0800-1220

    (OS41B-1961) Interpretation of the Relationship between Benthic Fauna, Geologic Distributions, and Methane Seeps at Southern Hydrate Ridge, Oregon Continental Margin.
    Authors: K. Bigham, D.S. Kelley, J.R. Delaney
    Abstract: Deposits of methane sequestered along continental margins and their associated seeps are found worldwide. These seeps are of increasing interest and importance because of their potential as an energy source, their contribution to greenhouse gases, and the unique community of chemosynthetic microorganisms and fauna that they host. One of the best­studied methane seep sites is Southern Hydrate Ridge, which is at a water depth of ~800 m. It is located ~90 km west of Newport, Oregon. Despite extensive geophysical and biological research completed here, no studies have quantified the relationship of seep sites and seafloor geology to the spatial distribution and abundances of microbial and macrofaunal communities. High resolution, georeferenced photomosaics of the individual seeps and the associated biological communities at this site were collected in 2011, using the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS. Detailed analyses of these images has allowed for the quantification and characterization of the diversity and structure of the faunal community. Results show that both the distribution and abundances of seep organisms are highly variable. Further examination of these photomosaics may improve understanding of the relationships between faunal distributions and seep locations, with implications for the impacts that chemical gradients have on these ecosystems.
    (NH41A-1771) Statistical Features of Deep-ocean Tsunamis Based on 30 Years of Bottom Pressure Observations in the Northeast Pacific.
    Authors: I. Fine, R. Thomson, W.M. Chadwick, E.E. Davis, C.G. Fox
    Abstract: We have used a set of high-resolution bottom pressure recorder (BPR) time series collected at Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge beginning in 1986 to examine tsunami waves of seismological origin in the northeast Pacific. These data are a combination of autonomous, internally-recording battery-powered instruments and cabled instruments on the OOI Cabled Array. Of the total of 120 tsunami events catalogued for the coasts of Japan, Alaska, western North America and Hawaii, we found evidence for 38 events in the Axial Seamount BPR records. Many of these tsunamis were not observed along the adjacent west coast of the USA and Canada because of the much higher noise level of coastal locations and the lack of digital tide gauge data prior to 2000. We have also identified several tsunamis of apparent seismological origin that were observed at coastal stations but not at the deep ocean site. Careful analysis of these observations suggests that they were likely of meteorological origin.

    Analysis of the pressure measurements from Axial Seamount, along with BPR measurements from a nearby ODP CORK (Ocean Drilling Program Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) borehole and DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) locations, reveals features of deepocean tsunamis that are markedly different from features observed at coastal locations. Results also show that the energy of deep-ocean tsunamis can differ significantly among the three sets of stations despite their close spatial spacing and that this difference is strongly dependent on the direction of the incoming tsunami waves.

    These deep-ocean observations provide the most comprehensive statistics possible for tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean over the past 30 years. New insight into the distribution of tsunami amplitudes and wave energy derived from the deep-ocean sites should prove useful for long-term tsunami prediction and mitigation for coastal communities along the west coast of the USA and Canada.

    (OS41C-1970) Using the OOI Cabled Array HD Camera to Explore Geophysical and Oceanographic Problems at Axial Seamount. 
    Authors: T.J. Crone, F. Knuth, A. Marburg
    ABSTRACT: A broad array of Earth science problems can be investigated using high-definition video imagery from the seafloor, ranging from those that are geological and geophysical in nature, to those that are biological and water-column related. A high-definition video camera was installed as part of the Ocean Observatory Initiative’s core instrument suite on the Cabled Array, a real-time fiber optic data and power system that stretches from the Oregon Coast to Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This camera runs a 14-minute pan-tilt-zoom routine 8 times per day, focusing on locations of scientific interest on and near the Mushroom vent in the ASHES hydrothermal field inside the Axial caldera. The system produces 13 GB of lossless HD video every 3 hours, and at the time of this writing it has generated 2100 recordings totaling 28.5 TB since it began streaming data into the OOI archive in August of 2015.

    Because of the large size of this dataset, downloading the entirety of the video for long timescale investigations is not practical. We are developing a set of user-side tools for downloading single frames and frame ranges from the OOI HD camera raw data archive to aid users interested in using these data for their research. We use these tools to download about one year’s worth of partial frame sets to investigate several questions regarding the hydrothermal system at ASHES, including the variability of bacterial “floc” in the water-column, and changes in high temperature fluid fluxes using optical flow techniques. We show that while these user-side tools can facilitate rudimentary scientific investigations using the HD camera data, a server-side computing environment that allows users to explore this dataset without downloading any raw video will be required for more advanced investigations to flourish.

    (OS41C-1992) Seismic and Tectonic Monitoring of the Endeavour Ridge Segment—Recent and Future Expansion of Ocean Networks Canada’s NEPTUNE Observatory on the Juan de Fuca Ridge.
    Authors: M. Heesemann, E.E. Davis, M. Scherwath, H. Kao, L.A. Coogan, G.C. Rogers, W.S.D. Wilcock
    Abstract: Ocean Networks Canada’s (ONC) NEPTUNE observatory provides real-time access to sensors on the Endeavour Ridge Segment (Endeavour)—a focus site on the Juan de Fuca Ridge System that is complementary to one on Axial Volcano that is connected through the Ocean Observatories Initiative’s (OOI) Cabled Array. While first instruments (including cameras, a short-period seismometer, and vent monitoring instruments) installed at the Main Endeavour vent field have been sending data since summer 2010, unreliable extension cables precluded continuous time-series from other nearby locations. With the successful installation of four extension cables, the summer of 2016 represents an important milestone in the instrumentation of the Endeavour Ridge Segment.

    We will present an overview of the data that are available in near real-time from Endeavour and new instrumentation that is scheduled for installation in 2017, and highlight first results derived from the new seismo-tectonic network now in operation. This network consists of three short-period seismometers (Mothra Field, Main Endeavour Field, Regional Circulation North), one broadband seismometer (western Ridge Flank), and four bottom pressure recorders (Mothra Field, Regional Circulation South, Main Endeavour Field, western Ridge Flank). The pressure recorders will provide both seismic and oceanographic data, and allow to measure differential vertical motion among the sites. We will also highlight a new technique to determine long period seafloor deformation from broadband seismometer mass-position measurements, using data from the Ridge Flank instrument as an example.

    (OS41C-1993) Waveform Template Matching and Analysis of Hydroacoustic Events from the April-May 2015 Eruption of Axial Volcano.
    Authors: M.E. Mann, D.R. Bohnenstiehl, J. Weis
    Abstract: The submarine emplacement of new lava flows during the 2015 eruption of Axial Volcano generated a series of impulsive acoustic signals that were captured by seismic and hydrophone sensors deployed as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative cabled array network. A catalog of >37,000 explosions was created using a four-channel waveform matching routine using ~800 template arrivals. Most of the explosions are sourced from a set of lava mounds erupted along the volcano’s northern rift; however, a subset of ~400 explosions are located within the caldera and track the flow of lava from a vent near its eastern rim. The earliest explosion occurs at ~08:00 UTC on April 24, approximately four hours after the seismicity rate began to increase and two hours after bottom pressure recorders indicate the caldera floor began to subside. Between April 24 and 28 event rates are sustained at ~1000/day. The rate then decreases gradually with explosive activity ending on 21 May, coincident with the initial re-inflation of the caldera. The windowed coefficient of variation of the inter-event time is approximately 1 throughout the eruption, consistent with a random process. The size-frequency distribution shows a bimodal pattern, with the loudest explosions, having received levels up to 157 dB re 1 micro-Pa, being produced during the first few hours of the eruption.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED – We will be accepting one slide submission until Thurs. 12/8. We look forward to seeing each of you at the upcoming 2016 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, CA. The OOI will be hosting a town hall Tues. Dec. 13, from 6:15-7:15 PM in Moscone West Room 2008.

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Scientists and engineers from the OOI Marine Implementing Organizations (MIOs) and the OOI Data Team are gearing up to present at the 2016 MTS/IEEE Oceans conference in Monterey Bay, CA September 19 – 22, 2016.

The event is set to draw an international audience of more than 2,000 attendees. The conference will center around presentations and posters from over 500 professionally reviewed technical papers, including those submitted by OOI scientists and engineers.

We look forward to connecting with you all at the conference.

OOI Related Presentations

Tuesday Sept. 20

1:30-3:00, Marriott: San Francisco

    Wilcock, W.D.S., D.A. Schmidt, J.E. Vidale, M.J. Harrington, P. Boudin, et al. Designing an Offshore Geophysical Network in the Pacific Northwest for Earthquake and Tsunami Early Warning and Hazard Research

    Manalang, D., and J.R. Delaney. Axial Seamount – Restless, Wired and Occupied: A Conceptual overview of Resident AUV Operations and Technologies.

    Kelley, D.S., J.R. Delaney, and the Cabled Array Team. NSF’s Cabled Array: A Wired Tectonic Plate and Overlying Ocean

5:30-5:00, Marriott: San Francisco

    McRae, E. Continuous Real Time Scanning of the Upper Ocean Water Column.

Wednesday Sept. 21

10:30-12:00, Portola: Cotton Wood 2

    Philip, B.T., D.S. Kelley, E.A.Solomon, and J.R. Delaney. Monitoring Methane Emissions at Southern Hydrate Ridge using an OOI Cabled Array Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler.

1:30-3:00, Marriott: Santa Barbara

    Delaney, J.R., D.S. Kelley, A. Marburg, M. Stoermer, H. Hadaway, K. Juniper, and F. Knuth. Axial Seamount – Wired and Restless: A Cabled Submarine Network Enables Real-time tracking of a Mid-Ocean Ridge Eruption and Live Video of an Active Hydrothermal System Juan de Fuca Ridge, NE Pacific

Thursday Sept. 22

8:30-10:00, Marriott: Santa Barbara

    Marburg, A., and K. Bigham. Deep Learning for Benthic Fauna Identification

10:30-12:00, Portola: Cotton Wood 2

    Knuth, F., L. Belabassi, L. Garizio, M. Smith, M. Vardaro, and A. Marburg. Automated QA/QC and Time Series Analyses on OOI High-Definition Video Data

    Belabbassi, L., L. Garzio, M. Smith, F. Knuth, J. Kerfoot, M. Vardaro, and M. Crowley. Successes and Lessons Learned from OOI End-to-End System Data Quality Audit

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The OOI team is gearing up for the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting Feb. 21-24 in New Orleans, LA. We look forward to connecting with you all at the conference and have planned a number of informational exchange opportunities. In addition to numerous posters and presentations (schedule to be posted next week!), swing by the OOI booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #611) and connect with us at our Town Hall Tuesday.

OOI Town Hall

Tuesday, February 23, 2016: 12:45 – 1:45 PM
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Rm. 220-221

Join the OOI Program Director, Greg Ulses, the OOI Scientific Oversight Committee, and the National Science Foundation to discuss the newly commission OOI. Topics to be discussed include: array configuration, data access and availability, case studies of data use, and upcoming plans for the next calendar year. There will also be time for a question and answer period. Light snacks will be provided.
[button link="/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/OOI_OS2016_Townhall_2016-02-23_ver1-02.pdf" bg_color="#004377" border="#00a9dd" window="yes"]Download Town Hall Presentation[/button]

Chat with the OOI Data Team

We are excited to share the live OOI Data Portal with visitors to the Booth (#611). Members of the OOI data team will be onsite and ready to answer your questions from 10am-12pm Tuesday and 10am-2pm Wednesday and Thursday. Feel free to swing by! If you have a question about a specific platform, instrument, or data product, please send a note to the HelpDesk ahead of time so we can schedule an appointment for you with a member of the team who has the most experience in that specific area. Please include the topics you would like to discuss as well as a list of potential dates/times in which you are available during Exhibit Hall hours. The Exhibit Hall is open from 9:30-6:00 Tuesday through Thursday.

Presentations

Monday, February 22, 2016

Session OD11A: Ocean Observatory Science: Unprecedented Access to the Sea I; 8:00-10:00 AM – Room: RO1

8:00-8:15 AM Transforming Ocean Sciences in the Northeast Pacific: NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array is Now Operational.
Author: Deborah Kelley
Institution: University of Washington
Abstract OD11A-01: In July-August, 2015 the first operations and maintenance cruise was successfully completed for the high power and bandwidth underwater cabled component of the National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observatories Initiative: the Cabled Array. This system includes 900 km of backbone cable and 7 Primary Nodes, which provide 8 kW power and 10 Gbs bandwidth to myriad seafloor instruments (Manalang et al.,this meeting) and instrumented full water column moorings (McRae et al., this meeting). Over 33,000 m of extension cables connected to 17 secondary junction boxes support >100 instruments now streaming data live to shore. In concert, this array forms: 1) the most advanced observatory along the global mid-ocean ridge network were 20 instruments and a state-of-the-art mooring system are providing new insights into volcanic and overlying water column processes at Axial Seamount (which erupted April 2015, see Delaney et al., this meeting); and 2) an extensive, technologically-advanced coastal observatory spanning 80 m to 2900 m water depths off Newport, OR. Here, cabled, instrumented moorings, with up to 18 instruments each, and associated seafloor arrays provide real-time, coregistered geophysical, biogeochemical, and physical measurements at unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. Nearly 1.5 years of continuous data (see Knuth et al., this meeting), two-way communication capabilities that allow responses to events, and continuing real-time data flow, will allow the community to investigate in ways never before possible earthquakes along the Cascadia margin with impacts on fluid flow and release of methane into the hydrosphere, underwater eruptions resulting in perturbations to hydrothermal systems, associated biological communities, and overlying water column properties, and linkages among biogeochemical and physical processes along the Cascadia margin.

8:15-8:30 AM The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data, Data and More Data
Authors: Michael Crowley, Michael Vardaro, Leila Belabbassi, Michael Smith, Lori Garzio, Friedrich Knuth, Scott Glenn, Oscar Schofield, Charles Lichtenwalner, John Kerfoot
Institution: Rutgers University
Abstract OD11A-02: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and managed by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, is a networked infrastructure of science-driven sensor systems that measure the physical, chemical, geological, and biological variables in the ocean and seafloor on coastal, regional, and global scales. OOI long term research arrays have been installed off the Washington coast (Cabled), Massachusetts and Oregon coasts (Coastal) and off Alaska, Greenland, Chile and Argentina (Global). Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Oregon State University are responsible for the coastal and global moorings and their autonomous vehicles. The University of Washington is responsible for cabled seafloor systems and moorings. Rutgers University operates the Cyberinfrastructure (CI) portion of the OOI, which acquires, processes and distributes data to the scientists, researchers, educators and the public. It also provides observatory mission command and control, data assessment and distribution, and long-term data management. This talk will present an overview of the OOI infrastructure and its three primary websites which include: 1) An OOI overview website offering technical information on the infrastructure ranging from instruments to science goals, news, deployment updates, and information on the proposal process, 2) The Education and Public Engagement website where students can view and analyze exactly the same data that scientists have access to at exactly the same time, but with simple visualization tools and compartmentalized lessons that lead them through complex science questions, and 3) The primary data access website and machine to machine interface where anyone can plot or download data from the over 700 instruments within the OOI Network.

8:30-8:45 AM A First: Detailed Tracking of an Erupting Undersea Volcano and its Impacts on the Overlying Ocean via a Submarine Electro-Optical Sensor Network.
Author: John Delaney
Institution: University of Washington
Abstract OD11A-03: The scientifically diverse and technologically advanced cabled array component of the NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative consists of 900 km of electro-optical fiber deployed from Pacific City, OR, across active portions of the Juan de Fuca (JdF) tectonic plate, and upward into the overlying ocean. This array, completed in 2014 on time and under budget, enables real-time, high-bandwidth, 2-way communication with seafloor and water column sensor arrays across: 1. the Cascadia accretionary prism, 2. the JdF spreading center, and, 3. portions of the overlying NE Pacific. Oceanographic processes in coastal waters, the California Current, and up to 400 km offshore, are captured by six remote-controlled, profiling moorings covering full-ocean depths. Currently, 6 primary nodes, 17 junction boxes, and ~85% of 150 instruments are transmitting data ashore to the Internet via the Pacific NW Gigapop (http://www.pnwgp.net/). All data are archived at the U. of Washington, pending completion of the OOI CyberInfrastructure in October 2015.
In 2014, community requests to access data to assess inflation at Axial Seamount, resulted in NSF releasing real-time data from 7 seismometers and 3 pressure sensors (IRIS: http://www.iris.edu/hq/). On April 20-22, 90 participants, met in Seattle to explore scientific responses to an eruption (http://novae.ocean.washington.edu). On April 24, Axial did erupt; seismic events rose dramatically to many hundreds/hour the Axial caldera floor dropped 2.4 m in ~16 hours and water temperatures rose by ~0.7°C, then declined in 3 weeks to normal values. Water-borne acoustic signals indicated seafloor activity along the rift zone north of Axial. Water column observations also indicated that a large plume of hydrothermal fluid was released during the eruptions. Follow-on field programs documented a 127 m thick lava flow on the northern rift, and a thin eruption within the caldera. These events signal a new era in Ocean Sciences as instantaneous Internet access to events far offshore begin allowing interactive responses to complex processes unfolding within our ocean. The attached figure shows the contact between 3.5 month old lava (black) and a much older flow.

9:00-9:15 AM The Ocean Observatories Initiative Data Management and QA/QC: Lessons Learned and the Path Ahead
Authors: Michael Vardaro, Leila Belabbassi, Lori Garzio, Friedrich Knuth, Michael Smith, Michael Crowley
Institution: Rutgers University
Abstract OD11A-05: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) is a multi-decadal, NSF-funded program that will provide long-term, near real-time cabled and telemetered measurements of climate variability, ocean circulation, ecosystem dynamics, air-sea exchange, seafloor processes, and plate-scale geodynamics. The OOI platforms consist of seafloor sensors, fixed moorings, and mobile assets containing over 700 operational instruments in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Rutgers University operates the Cyberinfrastructure (CI) component of the OOI, which acquires, processes and distributes data to scientists, researchers, educators and the public. It will also provide observatory mission command and control, data assessment and distribution, and long-term data management. The Rutgers Data Management Team consists of a data manager and four data evaluators, who are tasked with ensuring data completeness and quality, as well as interaction with OOI users to facilitate data delivery and utility. Here we will discuss the procedures developed to guide the data team workflow, the automated QC algorithms and human-in-the-loop (HITL) annotations that are used to flag suspect data (whether due to instrument failures, biofouling, or unanticipated events), system alerts and alarms, long-term data storage and CF (Climate and Forecast) standard compliance, and the lessons learned during construction and the first several months of OOI operations.
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Ocean Observatories Initiative Posters

Monday – February 22 – Poster Hall 4:00-6:00 PM

Poster #2291 A Cabled, High Bandwidth Instrument Platform for Continuous Scanning of the Upper Ocean Water Column.
Authors: Eric McRae, John Delaney, Deborah Kelly, Kendra Daly, Douglas Luther, Gary Harkins, Michael Harrington, Chuck McGuire, James Tilley, Jesse Dosher, Patrick Waite, Geoff Cram, Orest Kawka;
Institutions: Univ. of Washington, Univ. of South Florida, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract IS14A-2291: The Cabled Array portion of the National Science Foundation funded Ocean Observatories Initiative is a large scale, high bandwidth and high power subsea science network designed by the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory. Part of that system is a set of winched profilers which continuously scan the upper 200m of the ocean at their deployment sites.
The custom built profilers leverage the Cabled Array’s technology for interfacing collections of science instruments and add the ability to run predefined missions and to switch missions or mission parameters on the fly via command from shore. The profilers were designed to operate continuously for up to two years after deployment after which certain wearing components must be replaced.
The data from the profiler’s science and engineering sensors are streamed to shore via the seafloor network in real time. Data channel capacity from the profilers exceeds 40 Mbps. For profiler safety, mission execution is controlled within the platform. Inputs such as 3D gyro, pressure depth and deployed cable calculations are monitored to assure safe operation during any sea state. The profilers never surface but are designed to approach within 5m of the surface if conditions allow. Substantial engineering effort was focused on reliable cable handling under all ocean conditions.
The profilers are currently operated from subsea moorings which also contain sets of fixed science and engineering sensors. The profilers and their associated mooring instrument assemblies are designed for rapid replacement using ROVs.
We have operated this system for two years, including one annual maintenance turn and information relative to that experience will be included in the paper.
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Poster #2394 The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data Access and Visualization via the Graphical User Interface
Authors: Lori Garzio, Leila Belabbassi, Friedrich Knuth, Michael Smith, Michael Crowley, Michael Vardaro
Institution: Rutgers University
Abstract OD14A-2394: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), funded by the National Science Foundation, is a broad-scale, multidisciplinary effort to transform oceanographic research by providing users with real-time access to long-term datasets from a variety of deployed physical, chemical, biological, and geological sensors. The global array component of the OOI includes four high latitude sites: Irminger Sea off Greenland, Station Papa in the Gulf of Alaska, Argentine Basin off the coast of Argentina, and Southern Ocean near coordinates 55°S and 90°W. Each site is composed of fixed moorings, hybrid profiler moorings and mobile assets, with a total of approximately 110 instruments at each site. Near real-time (telemetered) and recovered data from these instruments can be visualized and downloaded via the OOI Graphical User Interface. In this Interface, the user can visualize scientific parameters via six different plotting functions with options to specify time ranges and apply various QA/QC tests. Data streams from all instruments can also be downloaded in different formats (CSV, JSON, and NetCDF) for further data processing, visualization, and comparison to supplementary datasets. In addition, users can view alerts and alarms in the system, access relevant metadata and deployment information for specific instruments, and find infrastructure specifics for each array including location, sampling strategies, deployment schedules, and technical drawings. These datasets from the OOI provide an unprecedented opportunity to transform oceanographic research and education, and will be readily accessible to the general public via the OOI’s Graphical User Interface.

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Poster #2395 Quality Assurance of Real-Time Oceanographic Data from the Cabled Array of the Ocean Observatories Initiative.
Authors: Orest Kawka, Julie Nelson, Deborah Kelley
Institution: University of Washington, Grays Harbor College
Abstract OD14A-2395: The Cabled Array component of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) provides access to real-time physical, chemical, geological, and biological data from water column and seafloor platforms/instruments at sites spanning the southern half of the Juan de Fuca Plate. The Quality Assurance (QA) program for OOI data is designed to ensure that data products meet OOI science requirements. This overall data QA plan establishes the guidelines for assuring OOI data quality and summarizes Quality Control (QC) protocols and procedures, based on best practices, which can be utilized to ensure the highest quality data across the OOI program. This presentation will highlight, specifically, the QA/QC approach being utilized for the OOI Cabled Array infrastructure and data and will include a summary of both shipboard and shore-based protocols currently in use. Aspects addressed will be pre-deployment instrument testing and calibration checks, post-deployment and pre-recovery field verification of data, and post-recovery “as-found” testing of instruments. Examples of QA/QC data will be presented and specific cases of cabled data will be discussed in the context of quality assessments and adjustment/correction of OOI datasets overall for inherent sensor drift and/or instrument fouling.
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Poster #2396 The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data Acquisition Functions and Its Built-In Automated Python Modules
Authors: Michael Smith, Michael Vardaro, Michael Crowley, Scott Glenn, Oscar Schofield, Leila Belabbassi, Lori Garzio, Friedrich Knuth,Jonathan Fram
Institutions: Rutgers University, Oregon State University
Abstract OD14A-2396: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), funded by the National Science Foundation, provides users with access to long-term datasets from a variety of oceanographic sensors. The Endurance Array in the Pacific Ocean consists of two separate lines off the coasts of Oregon and Washington. The Oregon line consists of 7 moorings, two cabled benthic experiment packages and 6 underwater gliders. The Washington line comprises 6 moorings and 6 gliders. Each mooring is outfitted with a variety of instrument packages. The raw data from these instruments are sent to shore via satellite communication and in some cases, via fiber optic cable. Raw data is then sent to the cyberinfrastructure (CI) group at Rutgers where it is aggregated, parsed into thousands of different data streams, and integrated into a software package called uFrame. The OOI CI delivers the data to the general public via a web interface that outputs data into commonly used scientific data file formats such as JSON, netCDF, and CSV. The Rutgers data management team has developed a series of command-line Python tools that streamline data acquisition in order to facilitate the QA/QC review process. The first step in the process is querying the uFrame database for a list of all available platforms. From this list, a user can choose a specific platform and automatically download all available datasets from the specified platform. The downloaded dataset is plotted using a generalized Python netcdf plotting routine that utilizes a data visualization toolbox called matplotlib. This routine loads each netCDF file separately and outputs plots by each available parameter. These Python tools have been uploaded to a Github repository that is openly available to help facilitate OOI data access and visualization.
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Poster #2397 The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Unprecedented access to real-time data streaming from the Cabled Array through OOI Cyberinfrastructure
Authors: Friedrich Knuth, Michael Vardaro, Leila Belabbassi, Michael Smith, Lori Garzio, Michael Crowley, Orest Kawka
Institutions: Rutgers University and the University of Washington
Abstract OD14A-2397: The National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), is a broad-scale, multidisciplinary facility that will transform oceanographic research by providing users with unprecedented access to long-term datasets from a variety of deployed physical, chemical, biological, and geological sensors. The Cabled Array component of the OOI, installed and operated by the University of Washington, is located on the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate off the coast of Oregon. It is a unique network of >100 cabled instruments and instrumented moorings transmitting data to shore in real-time via fiber optic technology. Instruments now installed include HD video and digital still cameras, mass spectrometers, a resistivity-temperature probe inside the orifice of a high-temperature hydrothermal vent, upward-looking ADCP’s, pH and pC02 sensors, Horizontal Electrometer Pressure Inverted Echosounders and many others. Here, we present the technical aspects of data streaming from the Cabled Array through the OOI Cyberinfrastructure. We illustrate the types of instruments and data products available, data volume and density, processing levels and algorithms used, data delivery methods, file formats and access methods through the graphical user interface. Our goal is to facilitate the use and access to these unprecedented, co-registered oceanographic datasets. We encourage researchers to collaborate through the use of these simultaneous, interdisciplinary measurements, in the exploration of short-lived events (tectonic, volcanic, biological, severe storms), as well as long-term trends in ocean systems (circulation patterns, climate change, ocean acidity, ecosystem shifts).
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Poster #2399 The Ocean Observatories Initiative: Data pre-Processing: Diagnostic Tools to Prepare Data for QA/QC Processing
Authors: Leila Belabbassi,Lori Garzio, Michael Smith, Friedrich Knuth, Michael Vardaro
Institution: Rutgers University
Abstract OD14A-2399: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), funded by the National Science Foundation, provides users with access to long-term datasets from a variety of deployed oceanographic sensors. The Pioneer Array in the Atlantic Ocean off the Coast of New England hosts 10 moorings and 6 gliders. Each mooring is outfitted with 6 to 19 different instruments telemetering more than 1000 data streams. These data are available to science users to collaborate on common scientific goals such as water quality monitoring and scale variability measures of continental shelf processes and coastal open ocean exchanges. To serve this purpose, the acquired datasets undergo an iterative multi-step quality assurance and quality control procedure automated to work with all types of data. Data processing involves several stages, including a fundamental pre-processing step when the data are prepared for processing. This takes a considerable amount of processing time and is often not given enough thought in development initiatives. The volume and complexity of OOI data necessitates the development of a systematic diagnostic tool to enable the management of a comprehensive data information system for the OOI arrays. We present two examples to demonstrate the current OOI pre-processing diagnostic tool. First, Data Filtering is used to identify incomplete, incorrect, or irrelevant parts of the data and then replaces, modifies or deletes the coarse data. This provides data consistency with similar datasets in the system. Second, Data Normalization occurs when the database is organized in fields and tables to minimize redundancy and dependency. At the end of this step, the data are stored in one place to reduce the risk of data inconsistency and promote easy and efficient mapping to the database.

Poster #2423 Modular Seafloor and Water Column Systems for the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array
Authors: Dana Manalang, Michael Harrington, James Tilley, Jesse Dosher, Geoff Cram, Gary Harkins,Chuck McGuire, Patrick Waite, Eric McRae, Tim McGinnis, Mike Kenney, Chris Siani, Nicolas Michel-Hart, Skip Denny, Eric Boget, John Delaney, Orest Kawka, Kendra Daly, Douglas Luther, Deborah Kelley
Institutions: University of Washington, University of South Florida Tampa, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract OD14B-2423: Over the past decade, cabled ocean observatories have become an increasingly important way to collect continuous real-time data at remote subsea locations. This has led to the development of a class of subsea systems designed and built specifically to distribute power and bandwidth among sensing instrumentation on the seafloor and throughout the water column. Such systems are typically powered by shore-based infrastructure and involve networks of fiber optic and electrical cabling that provide real-time data access and control of remotely deployed instrumentation. Several subsea node types were developed and/or adapted for cabled use in order to complete the installation of the largest North American scientific cabled observatory in Oct, 2014. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Cabled Array, funded by the US National Science Foundation, consists of a core infrastructure that includes 900 km of fiber optic/electrical cables, five primary nodes, 18 seafloor junction boxes, three mooring-mounted winched profiling systems, and three wire-crawling profiler systems. In aggregate, the installed infrastructure has 200 dedicated scientific instrument ports (of which 120 are currently assigned), and is capable of further expansion. The installed system has a 25-year design life for reliable, sustained monitoring; and all nodes, profilers and instrument packages are ROV-serviceable. Now in it’s second year of operation, the systems that comprise the Cabled Array are providing reliable, 24/7 real-time data collection from deployed instrumentation, and offer a modular and scalable class of subsea systems for ocean observing. This presentation will provide an overview of the observatory-class subsystems of the OOI Cabled Array, focusing on the junction boxes, moorings and profilers that power and communicate with deployed instrumentation.
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Tuesday – February 23 – Poster Hall 4:00-6:00 PM

Poster #2455 Operationalizing Surface Piercing Profilers
Authors: Jonathan Fram, Jack Barth, Edward Dever, Bruce Rhoades, John Koegler
Institutions: Oregon State University, Sea-Bird Scientific
Abstract OD24A-2455: High vertical resolution profiles of surface waters with multi-parameter sensor packages are valuable for understanding coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean processes. Typically, these profilers are only able to be used for short periods of time due to lack of ruggedness, reliability, automation, and battery life. Over the last three years, the Ocean Observatories Initiative has partnered with WET Labs to improve a set of WET Labs Thetis profilers so that OOI can operate six of them year-round in waters up to 100 m in depth. These profiles sample 1-16 Hz while rising 25 cm/s. They include 8 instruments with more than a dozen sensors, and they have room for more. A smart winch on-board these profilers compensates for wave-driven heave, which enables them to surface and telemeter data via Iridium in up to 3 m waves, 10 m/s winds, and 40 cm/s mean water currents. Multiple firmware and electronics upgrades enable these profilers to automatically recover from problems, or at least put themselves in a state that minimizes the chance of loss/damage and allows for remote query & control via acoustic modem from a neighboring surface mooring. These and other improvements enable the system to capture periods of the year such as the beginning of the annual coastal upwelling-dominated period without fear from damage by spring storms. This contribution will show the new features, the overall capabilities, and the limitations of these profilers, and it will show what data are available from them through OOI.
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Thursday – February 25 – Poster Hall – 4:00-6:00 PM

Poster #1728 The OOI Ocean Education Portal: Enabling the Development of Online Data Investigations
Authors: Charles Lichtenwalner, Janice McDonnell, Michael Crowley, Annette deCharon, Carla Companion. Scott Glenn
Institutions: Rutgers University, University of Maine
Abstract ED44B-1728: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) was designed to transform ocean science, by establishing a long-term, multi-instrument, multi-platform research infrastructure at 7 arrays around the word. This unprecedented investment in ocean observation, funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a rich opportunity to reshape ocean science education as well. As part of the initial construction effort, an online Ocean Education Portal was developed to support the creation and sharing of educational resources by undergraduate faculty at universities and community colleges. The portal includes a suite of tools that enable the development of online activities for use as group or individual projects, which can be used during lectures or as homework assignments. The site includes: 1) a suite of interactive educational data visualization tools that provide simple and targeted interfaces to interact with OOI datasets; 2) a concept map builder that can be used by both educators and students to build networked diagrams of their knowledge; and 3) a “data investigation” builder that allows faculty to assemble resources into coherent learning modules. The site also includes a “vocabulary navigator” that provides a visual way to discover and learn about the OOI’s infrastructure and scientific design. The site allows users to browse an ever-growing database of resources created by the community, and likewise, users can share resources they create with others. As the OOI begins its 25-year operational phase, it is our hope that faculty will be able to use the tools and investigations on the Ocean Education Portal to bring real ocean science research to their undergraduate students.
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